Search

Africa's Public Procurement & Entrepreneurship Research Initiative – APPERI

Tag

Swaziland

Swaziland finance minister announces procurement reform


Supply Management

29 February 2012 | Angeline Albert

This year, the Swaziland government plans to introduce a public procurement agency to oversee the purchasing carried out by public bodies.

In this national budget speech, finance minister Majozi Sithole said that the Swaziland Public Procurement Regulatory Agency will be created in the 2012/13 financial year.

As well as overseeing public purchasing, the agency will provide an independent forum to assess suppliers’ complaints. In addition, a code of conduct for public sector procurement officials will also be adopted.

The changes come as a result of the country’s Procurement Act of 2010, which gained assent from His Majesty King Mswati III last year. The act also disqualifies public sector workers and politicians from supplying government with goods and services.

In his budget speech, Sithole said: “Government understands that improving public procurement can generate savings without compromising services to the public. It is also an area prone to corruption. That is why we have a new procurement act. In 2012, the government will apply the changes required.”

The minister emphasized the need for stronger fiscal discipline in government by investing in cost-saving policies, improving procurement and public finance management and fighting corruption.

Swaziland’s economy near collapse, says IMF


Mail&Guardian online

By MBABANE, SWAZILAND – Nov. 16 2011

Swaziland‘s economic growth will grind to near zero this year as the government’s fiscal crisis rocks banks and private businesses, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) warned on Wednesday. 

“The fiscal crisis has reached a critical stage. Government revenue collections are insufficient to cover essential government expenditures,” the IMF said after a two-week fact-finding mission to the kingdom.

Businesses dependent on government contracts were laying off workers or shutting down, the IMF said, projecting economic growth to slow to 0.3% this year.

Banks are also beginning to feel the pinch, head of mission Joannes Mongardini said, warning of an “outflow of deposits to South Africa” that was contributing to a liquidity problem...Read more.

Zambia: Inefficiency, expensive financing leads to high fuel cost


Times of Zambia

By Davies M.M Chanda,

October 31, 2011

THE Wynter Kabimba commission of inquiry on the Energy Regulation Board (ERB) has heard that Zambia has the highest cost of fuel in the mainland Southern African Development Community (SADC) regional bloc because of procurement inefficiency and an expensive financing arrangement.

The Zambia Association of Manufacturers (ZAM), in its written submission before the commission has proposed that Government should rationalise the tax regime for both crude and finished products by lowering them.

According to a written submission presented to the commission by the Zambia Association of Manufacturers vice-president Steve Mwansa, the price of diesel in 2008 for Botswana was US1.19, Malawi US$0.96, Mozambique US$1.05, Namibia US$1.04, South Africa 1.04, Swaziland US$0.99, Tanzania US$1.05 while the cost in Zambia was about US$1.48.

The submission made available to the Times yesterday state that Government should also issue permits to oil marketing companies to supply areas according to their geographical location such as Nacala development corridor supplying Eastern Province while addressing alternative routes such as Angola and Mozambique.

Mr Mwansa said with good practices as recommended by ZAM, the country’s cost of fuel could reduce and estimated 19 per cent for petrol while diesel price would drop by 17 per cent and that Kerosene would sale at 21 per cent less than the current price.

ZAM cited poor feedstock cargo formulation, lack of adequate national reserves, inefficient feedstock processing and underdeveloped infrastructure for the importation of the finished products. The association also stated that the taxation system was the highest within the mainland SADC member states and that Government levies, duties and other taxes were higher in Zambia compared to other countries. ZAM has since called for a more transparent procurement system for crude oil and comingled petroleum which should also reduce supply chain costs.

There was also a call for balancing the reduction in tax on fuel with the increased collections from other sectors such as mining. The tax in Botswana, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland and Tanzania ranges from 0.06 to 0.44 per cent while in Zambia, it stands at 0.55 per cent. The commission was constituted by President Michael Sata last month to establish what was causing the cost of fuel to remain higher than the rest of the region and establish bottlenecks in the procurement system.

Mr Mwansa said there was need to invest in preventive maintenance for the Tanzania-Zambia oil pipeline to reduce on the losses and that ERB percentage fees should be reduced. The commission is expected to hold its sittings today at the Mulungushi International Conference in Lusaka before moving to Ndola on the Copperbelt Province where sittings will take place at the council chambers.

The Big Interview: ‘My fight is about principles, not leases’


Xolani Mbanjwa
Roux Shabangu, the billionaire property developer at the centre of the R1.7bn leases saga that led to Public Works Minister Gwen Mahlangu-Nkabinde being fired and police commissioner Gen Bheki Cele suspended, believes that he has been treated unfairly.Shabangu, who has been hogging the headlines since he clinched the controversial lease contract from the Department of Public Works that have since been deemed “unlawful” by public protector Thuli Madonsela, is unhappy about the findings.He made this clear in an interview during which his wife, Percy, a law student, sat alongside him at his plush offices in Irene, Pretoria. Shabangu only has a matric.Shabangu bitterly complains how being black has unfairly thrust him into the spotlight and accuses white property developers – and his former business partner – of working with the media to tarnish his name.

His business portfolio boasts a string of shopping centres, mines in South Africa and Swaziland, properties, boats and vehicles. Shabangu scoffed at allegations that he clinched the lucrative lease contract for the new police headquarters in Pretoria only because of his political and business connections.

“People think I’ve got money because Zuma is the president. It’s rubbish. Why didn’t I need Thabo Mbeki when I was building Jabulani Mall (in Soweto) and other developments?

“Why would I rely on connections now? I’ve always had connections. I don’t have unique ones now. I know the same people I knew back then,” said the 37-year-old father of four.

The former amateur boxer said the success he’s achieved “especially at my age should be celebrated, but you can see that some people are aggrieved about my business”.

“Zuma is 69, I’ve just turned 37,” Shabangu said, introducing a new conversation while sidestepping the question about inflated leases he signed with government.

He confidently declared that his legal team would clear his name and successfully defend Mahlangu-Nkabinde’s bid to get the Sanlam-Middestad building lease nullified by the Pretoria High CourtRead more.

Swaziland: Business must exploit regional public procurement


COMESA
Image via Wikipedia

July 8th, 2011

by  Nomthandazo Nkambule

COMMON Market for East and Southern Africa (COMESA) Procurement Expert Isaac Ndahiro has urged the business community in the country to exploit the opportunity availed by the harmonisation of public procurement in the region.

He said this was to enable them to participate in the expanded market of COMESA through supplying various government requirements needed amongst member states.

He said COMESA member states, including Swaziland had made a significant contribution to formulating their laws and regulations which govern public procurement to foster harmonisation of procedures and also make it user friendly for the business community in the regionNdahiro said such laws and regulations would promote predictability of the regulatory regime.

He said most COMESA member states had developed more or less uniform procedures and corresponding practices in conducting public procurement.
Ndahiro was speaking during a business opportunity seminar held at Esibayeni Lodge organised by COMESA in partnership with government and the Federation of Swaziland Employers and Chamber of Commerce (FSE&CC).
approach…Read more.

Swaziland-Meat suppliers call for adjustment of tenders


Ruptured blisters on the feet of a pig with FMD
Image via Wikipedia

Swazi Observer by Winile Mavuso

March 18, 2011.

MEAT suppliers say government would have to adjust the procurement process now that they are sourcing meat from Botswana.
Businessman and Senator Robert Zwane said he was on his way to Botswana to find out about the logistics of sourcing meat from that country.
He said their businesses were crumbling as a result of the ban on meat imports from South Africa.
Government imposed the ban following an outbreak of foot and mouth disease (FDM) at the KwaZulu Natal province. Zwane said what government did not tell farmers was that they could import meat from Botswana instead of leaving their businesses to suffer as a result of the ban.
He said they relied heavily on South Africa because Swaziland produced very little livestock for the market. When called yesterday, Zwane revealed that he was on his way to Botswana to find out more about the meat available for importation into the country. Read more

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: