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African surveillance market on the rise


Defenceweb

April 18, 2013

The size of the African surveillance market is expected to increase dramatically over the next five years, notably due to unrest affecting the continent.

As unrest and security threats continue to escalate, particularly in Northern Africa, it is reasonable to assume that there will be an increased demand for surveillance technology within the next six months, from various security forces across the region as new opportunities for companies providing surveillance solutions are being created, according to Vislink, a global company specialising in the design and manufacture of secure video communications systems.

Vislink, with offices in South Africa, the UK, USA, UAE, Australia and Singapore, said that the African military and surveillance sectors are still not mature in terms of the technology available to them and so considerable investment in this technology will be required.

“Vislink is ideally situated to capitalise upon this demand, providing the high-quality but affordable equipment necessary to deliver an all-encompassing security effort,” stated Ali Zarkesh, Business Development Director at Vislink.

Globally, the company is doing well in the surveillance and military markets – in 2011, Vislink’s activity in the military field represented 16% of the company’s total revenues and the global market for Vislink’s surveillance products currently sits at around £200 million. Vislink’s activity in the law enforcement sector, which represents 70% of total surveillance revenues, is specifically driven by the growing need for robust video surveillance.

At present, the biggest opportunities in the military and surveillance space are coming from the Middle East, Far East and Latin America, Zarkesh said. Growth in the Middle East is driven by the volatile geopolitical environment and subsequent rising trend in upgrading military communications systems and networks. Vislink is also seeing significant opportunities from coalition forces deployed around the world. These bodies require a reliable means of communication to connect foot patrols, airborne units and command centres.

North African countries, in particular, are currently investing in surveillance solutions in order to help return a level of stability to the region. The political and security situation that has escalated in the past two years has created several opportunities for Vislink in this sector.

“It is also important to consider that several other countries in this part of the world have a heavy military focus. Wide ranging budgets are allocated to the defence sector in order to secure the country’s borders and protect its inhabitants. As a result, Vislink’s main opportunities across developing regions stem from growing covert surveillance demands,” Zarkesh said.

However, the future is not all bright as there are big challenges as well as opportunities in the defence industry. For instance, the UK spends around £34 billion on defence each year, yet the armed forces have recently seen the biggest budget cuts to their sector since 1991. This presents a unique challenge in itself, with military personnel requiring the same high-quality surveillance solutions as before, but now without the premium price tag, Vislink pointed out.

Vislink specialises in the production of satellite, wireless, video and IP solutions and targets government, surveillance, broadcast and news markets. For instance it delivers news gathering tools for the media and surveillance options for the government and military.

The company recently launched its Mantis MSAT, which it claims is the world’s smallest and lightest satellite data terminal, weighing 12.5 kg (27.5 lb). “Following a successful launch, the product has been deployed by several military forces around the world,” Vislink said. The Mantis MSAT can deliver voice, video and data communications, including HD video. Initial military orders have been filled and Vislink’s MSAT terminals are currently undergoing field trials for battlefield, command centre and special operations implementations.

Trade between Europe and Africa: how to resuscitate an ailing deal


The Guardian

By Isabelle Ramdoo

Thursday, Feb. 28th, 2013

After 10 years of negotiations, how can policymakers on both sides revive a flagging relationship?

Trade negotiations between Europe and Africa seem to have stalled. Despite both sides last year celebrating the 10th anniversary of the start of negotiations over economic partnership agreements (EPAs), their attention now appears to have shifted elsewhere.

In crisis-ridden Europe, leaders are stressing the important contribution of trade to jobs and growth for economic recovery in Europe, as they did during the last European council in early February. They call for ambitious, proactive and constructive trade engagements with their “strategic partners”. But, interestingly, these partners are located on the other side of the Atlantic and in emerging Asian economies, as a letter by José Manuel Barroso, president of the European commission to Herman Van Rompuy, president of the council, highlights.

In his address to the commission, Barroso made no mention of Africa or the controversial EPAs, which haven’t been finalised by many, despite 10 long and difficult years of negotiations. And it’s no surprise why: the negotiations have been disappointing. Of the 77 African, Caribbean and Pacific countries negotiating with the EU, only 36 finalised an agreement, of which only 18 are in Africa.

Signals from Africa have not been much better: the continent is increasingly turning east and south, towards emerging markets, and is giving less attention to Europe. Although a few countries remained truly committed to an ambitious trade relationship with Europe, the lastAfrican Union summit, held in January, made no mention of EU-Africa trade. Instead, it focused on Africa’s own domestic economic dynamics, prioritising deeper regional economic integration and increased intra-Africa trade – a logical step and one which Europe itself has followed since the 1950s.

Given the political lethargy, the eurozone crisis that legitimises inward-facing economic politics and new dynamics in Africa, should we conclude that the trade relationship between Europe and Africa is dead? No. Despite all this, there are reasons and ways to resuscitate an ailing trade deal.

The reasons are that both regions remain important to each other: Europe is still the main trade, development and investment partner of most African countries. And despite its relatively low volume of trade with the EU, Africa is nevertheless a crucial source of hard and soft commodities for Europe, and in particular of strategic metals and minerals, essential for its high-tech and green-tech industries. Furthermore, the recent new discoveries of hydrocarbons are of crucial geo-strategic importance – they represent an important alternative, given the difficult political situation in the Middle East, notably with Iran. By keeping trade talks locked in the EPA debates, Europe might accentuate resentments in Africa and therefore miss out on the emerging opportunities. Continued game playing would clearly be counter-productive for both sides.

Develop a partnership of equals

What is needed is a more mature relationship, one that is based on understanding the changing dynamics of both partners and on a real partnership of equals. Europe and Africa have to be clear on their agenda, define their expectations and priorities according to agreed values, principles and interests. The shifting international balance of power places Africa in a better position to revive its partnerships to make them more effective – the challenge will be to translate the new vision into action.

On its side, Europe’s diminishing political clout in Africa implies that it needs to rethink its strategy to become a smarter partner and its engagement with developing countries in Asia or Latin America is proof that Europe can cut its coat according to its cloth. Relationships with Asia and Latin America are more business-like in nature and reflect the priorities and ambitions of each partner. The EU–Latin America and the Caribbean summit, held in January, focused on alliance for sustainable development to promote investment of social and environmental quality. In Asia, the focus is clearly on strategic economic partnerships, with specific relationships nurtured with ChinaIndiaJapan and South Korea.

Clear, consistent communications are key

Both partners have to learn to listen to each other and avoid mixed signals and conflicting incentives. Currently, Europe does not have a coherent agenda for Africa: it has different and multispeed approaches to North AfricaSouth Africa and the rest of sub-Saharan Africa. Even towards the last segment, it has different policies as the recent desire tofocus engagement on least developed countries underlines.

Appreciate regional differences

In addition, the limited success of the EPAs should teach policymakers that insisting on comprehensive trade agreements with countries that have different expectations simply does not work. Agreements should instead reflect the real interests and capacity of countries. Botswana is not Guinea. European wonks should be careful in their engagement with North Africa so that political conditionalities do not ultimately backfire on the EU’s relationship with the whole region.

Timing is everything

The moment for change is opportune. The African Union has a new chairperson who has taken up the challenge to lift the continent into a new prosperous era. Beyond gathering her troops to deliver the “African renaissance”, Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma will have to reboot the collaboration with international partners. The challenge for her will be to balance Africa’s geo-strategic interests to get the most of all partners. For Europe, the challenge will be to plug into the new dynamics and remain relevant. But both sides need to think of a revived partnership that goes beyond trade and effectively support Africa’s structural transformation. It is the harder ask but one that will lead to the most sustainable mutual gains, and is something worth considering at theupcoming EU-Africa Summit, scheduled for the first half of 2014.

Isabelle Ramdoo is the trade and economic governance policy officer at the European Centre for Development Policy Management (ECDPM). Follow her on Twitter: @ir_ramdoo

This content is brought to you by Guardian Professional.

AAR Promotes Technical Procurement, Supply Chain Management at MRO Africa


Aviationpros.com

February 27, 2013

WOOD DALE, Illinois, February 27, 2013 – In a further sign of its commitment to doing business in Africa, a senior executive from global aerospace leader AAR’s (NYSE: AIR) Middle East, Africa and India Operations will participate in a panel focused on technical procurement and supply chain management at the 22nd annual MRO Africa Conference and Exhibition in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

On Wednesday, Rahul Shah, Senior Vice President and Managing Director, Middle East, Africa and India Operations, will join the discussion, “Optimizing Technical Procurement and Supply Chain Management,” along with representatives from Kenya Airlines, South African Airways and Air Namibia.

This year, the conference, sponsored by Ethiopian Airlines, is focused on establishing centers of excellence and standardizing aircraft maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) capabilities for airline fleets across the African continent. The forum, which opened on Monday, also aims to promote closer technical cooperation between African airlines, as well as develop relationships with aircraft and engine manufacturers, industry suppliers and aviation service and technology firms, such as AAR.

“There are exciting advancements taking place in several African airlines that are poised for complete transformation in the very near term,” Shah said. “As these airlines continue to modernize and add more sophisticated aircraft to their fleets, AAR has the expertise to provide maintenance, repair and supply chain services directly to the airlines and the African aviation industries.”

The annual African aviation conferences are attended by senior government and regulatory bodies, airline and aviation officials; financial institutions; aircraft and engine leasing companies; MRO providers; and other key stakeholders worldwide.

On February 22, AAR Vice President of Government Affairs and Corporate Development Cheryle Jackson joined key government, business and international trade leaders in Washington, D.C., for the “Doing Business in Africa” forum sponsored by the White House Business Council. Jackson was a leader of the breakout session, “How to Get Started in Sub-Saharan Africa.”

About AAR

AAR is a global aerospace and defense contractor that employs more than 6,000 people in 17 countries. Based in Wood Dale, Illinois, AAR supports commercial, government and defense customers through two operating segments: Aviation Services and Technology Products. AAR’s services include inventory management and parts distribution; aircraft maintenance, repair and overhaul; and expeditionary airlift.  AAR’s products include cargo systems and containers; mobility systems and shelters; advanced aerostructures; and command and control systems.  More information can be found atwww.aarcorp.com.

S. African telecom firm helped Iran evade US sanctions, documents show


By Steve Stecklow  Reuters
August 30, 2012, 8:11 pm

Rogan Ward / Reuters  A shopkeeper awaits customers in a shop advertising MTN airtime sales in Umlazi township in Durban, South Africa.

LONDON — A South African telecom giant plotted to procure embargoed U.S. technology products for an Iranian subsidiary through outside vendors to circumvent American sanctions on the Islamic Republic, according to internal documents seen by Reuters.

The fresh revelations about MTN Group, buttressed by interviews with people familiar with the procurement, come as the South African multinational faces fights on several fronts over its lucrative but controversial Iranian venture, a fast-growing telecom.

MTN is in talks with the U.S. Treasury in an effort to win permission to repatriate millions of dollars of profit now bottled up in Iran by American sanctions on the Iranian financial system. MTN’s chief executive disclosed the talks with U.S. officials this month, saying, “U.S. sanctions should not have unintended consequences for non-U.S. companies.” An elite South African police unit is investigating how MTN obtained the Iranian telecom’s license, following corruption allegations made by a Turkish rival in a U.S. federal lawsuit.

Johannesburg-based MTN Group is Africa’s largest telecom carrier, with operations in more than 20 countries. It owns 49 percent of MTN Irancell, a joint venture with a consortium controlled by the Iranian government. The South African company provided the initial funding for the venture and oversaw the telecom’s launch in 2006.

Hundreds of pages of internal documents reviewed by Reuters show that MTN employees created presentations for meetings and wrote reports that openly discussed circumventing U.S. sanctions to source American tech equipment for MTN Irancell. The documents also address the potential consequences of getting caught. The sanctions are intended to curb Iran’s nuclear program, which Tehran maintains is peaceful.

The equipment included products from Sun Microsystems Inc, Oracle Corp, International Business Machines Corp, EMC Corp, Hewlett Packard Co and Cisco Systems Inc, and was used to provide such services as wiretapping, voice mail and text messaging, the documents show.

In a statement, MTN denied any wrongdoing. The U.S. companies have said they were not aware MTN Irancell had acquired their products, and several are investigating the matter. U.S. Treasury officials declined to comment.

‘It all showed up’ Reuters first reported in June that MTN Irancell had procured U.S. equipment through a network of tech companies in Iran and the Middle East. The article quoted Chris Kilowan, MTN’s top executive in Iran from 2004 to 2007, saying that the South African company was directly involved in obtaining U.S. parts for the Iranian telecom.

The new documents provide a much deeper understanding of the extent of MTN’s procurement of embargoed U.S. goods, exposing new links in the supply chain of products worth millions of dollars. They also give a rare inside look at the thinking of a multinational doing business in Iran and the difficult choices involved. The documents show that MTN was well aware of the U.S. sanctions, wrestled with how to deal with them and ultimately decided to circumvent them by relying on Middle Eastern firms inside and outside Iran.

MTN was not alone. In recent months, new evidence has emerged that other foreign companies, including Britain’s Standard Chartered bank and China’s ZTE Corp, have helped Iran undermine increasingly tougher sanctions. The bank, which agreed to pay $340 million to New York’s bank regulator to settle allegations it hid transactions with Iran, still faces a separate U.S. probe. ZTE is the subject of investigations by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Commerce Department after Reuters reported it had supplied U.S. equipment to Iran’s largest telecom.

The new MTN documents appear to detail an intentional effort to evade sanctions. For example, a January 2006 PowerPoint presentation prepared for the project steering committee — comprised of then top-level MTN executives — includes a slide titled “Measures adopted to comply with/bypass US embargoes.” It discussed how the company had decided to outsource Irancell’s data center after receiving legal advice.

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“In the absence of applicable U.S. consents, it is a less risky route to MTN for Irancell to outsource data centre than it is to purchase restricted products,” the PowerPoint slide says.

The documents also include a lengthy spreadsheet of “3rd Party” equipment dated June 2006 that lists hundreds of U.S. components — including servers, routers, storage devices and software — required for a variety of systems.

A delivery schedule also dated June 2006 lists U.S. equipment needed for “value-added services,” including voice mail and a wiretapping system. The schedule states that the equipment would be “Ready to Ship Dubai” that July and August. It estimates it would take two weeks to arrive in the southern Iranian port of Bandar Abbas by “Air or Sea/Road,” and then up to 30 days to clear Iranian customs.

According to a person familiar with the matter, the equipment ultimately arrived by boat. “It all showed up,” this person said.

‘Outstanding issues’ Reuters reported in June that a Kuwait-based telecom-service provider called Shabakkat was used to procure some U.S. equipment for MTN Irancell. Shabakkat’s former country manager in Iran said the products were purchased from a local Iranian company.

But the person familiar with the matter said Shabakkat also sourced U.S. products from a distributor in Dubai called Exit40. The distributor no longer operates.

A Shabakkat executive in Kuwait did not respond to requests for comment. Two former top executives of Exit40 could not be reached for comment.

The documents suggest procuring the U.S. parts often wasn’t easy, and the process was plagued by delays. For example, a “High Level Weekly Report” in November 2006 discusses problems sourcing Sun hardware.

“Urgent decision required to source SUN machines through local supplier,” it states. A note in red at the bottom of another PowerPoint slide says: “According to Shabakkat, all SUN HW is at Dubai waiting for Payment.” HW stands for hardware.

The following month, a spreadsheet detailing “Outstanding issues” cites delays in deploying a system called USSD that enables interactive services. “The USSD platform is completely built on SUN hardware – hence until the SUN hardware is delivered by Shabakkat USSD implementation will be delayed,” the spreadsheet says.

Paul Norman, MTN Group’s chief human resources and corporate affairs officer, said in a statement to Reuters: “MTN denies that it has ever conspired with suppliers to evade applicable U.S. sanctions on Iran or had a policy to do so. MTN works with reputable international suppliers. Our equipment is purchased from turnkey vendors and all our vendors are required to comply with U.S. and E.U. sanctions. We have checked vendor compliance procedures and continue to monitor them and we are confident they are robust.”

The Hawks, a South African police unit, is investigating MTN over allegations contained in a federal lawsuit filed in Washington in March by Turkcell, an Istanbul-based rival. The suit alleges that MTN stole the Iranian telecom license from Turkcell in November 2005 by paying bribes. MTN denies the allegations and has attacked the credibility of former MTN executive Kilowan, who is Turkcell’s key witness in the case. The procurement of banned U.S. products is not a subject of the lawsuit.

‘Civil and criminal consequences’ According to the internal procurement documents, right from the start MTN was well aware of what it termed “embargo issues” and the inherent risks involved.

A December 2005 PowerPoint presentation marked confidential and emblazoned with MTN’s logo noted that the “Consequences of non compliance” included “Civil and criminal consequences.” The PowerPoint slide added that the U.S. government could blacklist MTN, “which could result in all MTN operations being precluded from sourcing products/services from U.S. based companies in future.”

According to a person familiar with the matter, MTN was determined that MTN Irancell procure substantial amounts of U.S. equipment: The U.S. products had performed well in its other networks, and the company’s technicians were familiar with them. But MTN soon learned that its major contractors on the project — particularly Nokia — wouldn’t provide the equipment because of the U.S. embargo.

So MTN executives began to explore ways to procure the parts without violating sanctions, the documents show. The company initially explored an exception to the sanctions known as the “de minimis” rule. Under it, tech products can sometimes be legally exported to Iran from a foreign country if the aggregate value of the U.S. parts or technology inside is less than 10 percent.

According to the person familiar with the matter, MTN believed that if U.S. components comprised less than 10 percent of a large system, its major contractors could legally procure them. But the company learned that the rule applies to each component, not to an overall system.

“Once they figured it out, they realized the vendors wouldn’t accept that,” this person said. “Now they had a problem.”

According to a weekly report from December 2005, MTN also explored another alternative — obtaining U.S. parts from the so-called “grey market,” or unauthorized distribution channels. The report suggests “obtaining go ahead to procure US embargoed products … from grey market notwithstanding the adverse consequences to MTN.”

The person familiar with the situation said MTN was under tremendous pressure to launch the Iranian mobile operator as quickly as possible, because it had told shareholders it projected having 1 million subscribers by the end of 2006. The operator finally launched in October, after months of delays, and is now Iran’s second-largest wireless carrier by subscribers.

The procurement problems are referenced in numerous internal MTN and MTN Irancell documents. A June 2006 status report discussed delays in the delivery of essential components for value-added services, or VAS.

“The primary challenge in the establishment of the VAS solution is simply that the hardware platforms required are of US origin and therefore fall foul of the US embargo on exports to Iran,” the report says. “This means that innovative mechanisms need to be applied to secure delivery of the hardware platforms.” Another progress report makes reference to an “Order placed last week with Turkey and Iran to circumvent embargo issues.”

Reuters reported in June that some of the U.S. equipment — including at least a half-dozen Sun servers –was sourced locally through Iranian companies. But according to the person familiar with the matter, many other U.S. components were acquired via Dubai by Shabakkat, which was paid about $30 million to $40 million to acquire them — about twice their value.

“You had a buyer who was desperate,” the person said, referring to MTN. “They didn’t have any other options.”

Mahmoud Tadjallimehr became a project manager for Nokia on the MTN Irancell project in November 2006. In an interview, he said it was known within the mobile operator that Shabakkat was sourcing U.S. equipment for the project, and he dealt directly with the firm. But he said that one day in discussing a delivery problem, a Shabakkat manager told him, “The issue was not with Shabakkat but with Exit40.” He also said “someone told me that we should never use this name (Exit40) in any kind of emails or conversations.”

According to archive.org, which archives websites, Exit40’s site in 2006 described the firm as a privately held, “leading independent wholesale distributor of IT products” that was headquartered in Switzerland, with offices in Dubai, Florida, Switzerland and India. The site also included this boast: “Exit40’s procurement executives source hard to find or locally constrained products for customers.”

Procurement Leaders Need to Challenge Tradition to Build a Resilient and Agile Function


The Sacramento Bee
The Sacramento Bee (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Sacramento Bee

By IQPC Exchange

August, 24, 2012

LONDON, August 24, 2012 — /PRNewswire/ —

CPO Exchange releases results of pan-industry, C-level procurement survey:

  • 83% of procurement leaders agree that they need to rethink their procurement strategies to better position their organisations to tackle present and future challenge
  • 57% are aiming for cost reduction and better control of spend to improve efficiencies and gain greater influence in the organisation;
  • 45% of respondents are looking to improve stakeholder management and communication and;
  • 39% aim to streamline internal processes through deployment of procurement technologies.

Over the last six months IQPC Exchange spoke with a pan industry group of C-level procurement leaders spanning Europe, Asia, Africa and the Middle East to find out what strategies they have put in place to safeguard their organisations in the unsettled economic and political climate and how are their procurement departments are responding to the fact that volatility is the new ‘normal’.

83% of procurement leaders agree that they need to rethink their procurement strategies to better position their organisations to tackle present and future challenges. Consequently, procurement risk management and supplier risk management came up as a top priority for 62% surveyed.

Gathering business intelligence about their suppliers and key markets, closely monitoring critical KPIs and spreading their risk by having more suppliers are further strategies mentioned.

Livia Trubenova, Head of Research at the CPO Exchange, commented on the results: “This fascinating survey is just the start of our continuing research with CPOs. We can already see that procurement leaders are working on growing the influence of and recognition for the procurement function within their organisations I look forward to the lively debate and benchmarking at the next CPO Exchange!”

The CPO Exchange will be releasing expert views on these and other topics through speaker interviews and updated research findings with C-level procurement leaders on the CPO Exchange website http://www.cpoexchange.co.uk/PR. You can get involved by joining the CPO Exchange group on LinkedIn CPO Exchange to engage with leading procurement professionals.

The CPO Exchange is an invitation only event which brings together the most forward-thinking leaders in procurement to discuss strategic issues shaping their and your business agenda. This forum offers a perfect setting for leaders in procurement to network, benchmark and discuss effective business strategies. Attendees will tailor their agenda by selecting from a range of keynote presentations, lively panel debates, peer sharing roundtable discussions, interactive BrainWeave sessions and one-on-one business meetings of their choice.

For details of solution provider opportunities or to request your invitation, please get in touch with CPO Exchange team via exchangeinfo@iqpc.com or visit http://www.cpoexchange.co.uk/PR.

* Senior procurement professionals

About IQPC Exchange

IQPC Exchange provides business executives around the world with tailored practical conferences, large scale events, topical seminars and in-house training programmes, keeping them up-to-date with industry trends, technological developments and the regulatory landscape.

Contact:

Beata Majcher+44(0)20-7368-9404

SOURCE  IQPC Exchange

Canceling Out The ‘Background Noise’ On Egypt-Israel Relations


Minnesota Public Radio

by Dana Farrington, National Public Radio

April 29th, 2012

By ending a historic gas contract with Israel, is Egypt laying the groundwork for a fundamental shift in relations? Not quite, says Rob Malley of the International Crisis Group.

Malley, program director for the Middle East and North Africa, talks to NPR’s David Greene on Weekend Edition about last week’s announcement, which raised questions of political rifts. Malley says:

“What we’re seeing right now is a lot of noise, but no real change, partly because — if not essentially because — both the Israelis and the Egyptian security establishment believe that the relationship is critical for both of them.”

Israel and Egypt signed the historic Camp David peace treaty in 1979, and The Associated Press reports:

“While relations have never been particularly warm, the quiet border has been critical for the security of the two neighbors. Egyptian energy exports to Israel and other business ties have helped keep the peace.”

NPR’s Sheera Frenkel reports for Weekend Edition that the gas deal was signed in 2005 and intended to last for at least 15 years. Reuters calls it “the most significant economic agreement to follow” the 1979 treaty and Jordan’s treaty with Israel in 1994.

Israel has been getting about 40 percent of its gas from Egypt, according to the AP, yet Egypt said last Sunday that it was ending the gas contract. Government spokespersons in both Israel and Egypt are trying to downplay the issue as a dispute between two companies rather than a threat to the peace treaty, Frenkel reportsRead more.

Buyer Spend Activity and Procurement Behaviors and Strategies in the Airport Industry – 2011-2012: Survey Intelligence


PRESS RELEASE

PR Newswire logo
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NEW YORK, Nov. 2, 2011 /PRNewswire via COMTEX/ — Reportlinker.com announces
that a new market research report is available in its catalogue:

Buyer Spend Activity and Procurement Behaviors and Strategies in the Airport
Industry – 2011-2012: Survey Intelligence.

Accessed report here.

Synopsis

Analysis of opinions drawn from leading airport industry executives

Analysis on how procurement expenditure, business strategies and practices in
the airport industry are set to change in 2011-2012

Analysis on spending plans, budget allocations, challenges and investment
opportunities of purchase decision makers

summary

This report is the result of an extensive survey drawn from ICD Research’s
exclusive panel of leading airport industry executives. It analyzes how
procurement expenditure, business strategies and practices are set to change in
the airport industry in 2011-12. This report gives you access to the
category-level spending outlooks, budgets, supplier selection criteria, business
challenges and investment opportunities for leading purchase decision makers.
The report also identifies future growth of buyers and suppliers and
e-procurement. This report not only grants access to the opinions and strategies
of business decision makers and competitors, but also examines their actions
surrounding business priorities. The report also provides access to information
categorized by region, company type and size.

Scope

The opinions and forward looking statements of XXXX industry executives have
been captured in our in-depth survey, of which XX% represent Director and
C-level respondents.

The research is based on primary survey research conducted by ICD Research
accessing its B2B panels comprised of senior purchase decision makers and
leading supplier organizations.

The geographical scope of the research is global – drawing on the activity
and expectations of leading industry players across the Americas, Europe,
Asia-Pacific, Africa and Middle East.

Key topics covered include buyer expenditure activity, procurement behaviors
and strategies, threats and opportunities, economic outlook and business
confidence.

In the report, buyers identify what suppliers need to do to maintain their
business and the key actions being taken by industry players to overcome the
leading business threats.

The report examines current practices and provides future expectations for
the industry over the next 12-24 months.

Reasons To Buy

This report will help you to drive revenues by understanding future product
investment areas and growth regions.

This report will help you to formulate effective sales and marketing
strategies by identifying how buyer budgets are changing and the direction of
spend in the future.

This report will help you to better promote your business by aligning your
capabilities and business practices with your customer’s changing needs.

This report will help you to secure stronger customer relationships by
understanding the leading business concerns and changing strategies of industry
buyers.

This report will help you to predict how the industry will grow, consolidate
and where it will stagnate.

This report will help you to uncover the business outlook, key challenges and
opportunities identified by suppliers and buyers.

Aramex Targets Africa


Bloomberg.com

May 22, 201

by Zahra Hankir and Mourad Haroutunian

Aramex PJSC (ARMX UH): The Middle East’s largest courier company wants to grow in Africa and has set aside as much as $70 million for expansion and acquisitions there over the next two years, Chief Executive Officer Fadi Ghandour said. The shares increased 1.1 percent to 1.86 dirhams.

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