Search

Africa's Public Procurement & Entrepreneurship Research Initiative – APPERI

Tag

Business

Namibia: Procurement Bill Sparks Heated Debate


AllAfrica.com

By Tonateni Shidhudhu

October 3rd, 2013

Windhoek — The Public Procurement Bill that is currently being debated in the National Assembly is likely to be rejected, following strong criticism by several MPs on both sides of the house.

Debate resumed on Tuesday on the proposed law. Lawmakers are unhappy with the way the Bill was drafted, arguing that the role of government and that of new institutions to be created under the proposed law is not clear, and that the Bill has the potential to disadvantage businesses that are run by black Namibians. The debate was delayed last week, when lawmakers requested a workshop on the Bill to get a clear understanding of what the proposed legislation entails.

Swapo Party MP Kazenambo Kazenambo criticized the Bill calling on the Finance Minister

Saara Kuugongelwa-Amadhila to refer it back to the drafters. “I don’t see how the Ministry of Finance as an entity and other ministries are involved in the procurement system. I don’t understand the role of the Procurement Policy Office, there are so many offices and it is not clear who is supervising who, [since] the functions and powers of these offices are overlapping,” he said.

Kazenambo wants the finance minister to clarify the role of the institutions that are provided for in the Bill and how they differ from one another and also questioned the status of the Central Procurement Board and whether it is going to function as a parastatal or under which category of governance it would be placed.

If the Bill is passed, it will create a Central Procurement Board (CPB) to replace the current Tender Board that has had its fair share of controversy over the years. Kazenambo also queried why CPB members are given unlimited powers, especially that of extracting information about anyone bidding for a public tender, including their financial records. “I am seeing scandals coming, we live in this country as business [people], we are subjected to harassment and discrimination and sometimes just because you are black, people question from where you got the money,” he said. In terms of the Bill the Procurement Policy Office wil have the responsibility of advising the minister on policies, guidelines, standards and manuals required to maintain an internationally competitive public procurement system in Namibia. The office will also be responsible for recommending thresholds, disqualifying, debarring and suspending suppliers and conducting investigations where necessary.

This, according to Kazenambo, if not handled properly, has the potential to discriminate against locally manufactured products, especially those from businesses that are run by black Namibians. He made it clear that he is not in support of the current format of the Bill and walked out of parliament following his contribution, returning only later.

Swapo Party Chief Whip Professor Peter Katjavivi said while the Bill appears to be a tool of empowerment for disadvantaged communities, particularly women and young people, there are still issues that need to be clarified or rectified. He warned against the bureaucratic delays that may occur due to the various structures provided for under the proposed law. “The multiplicity of entities within the Bill creates a worry over bureaucratic delays. If you have the Procurement Policy Office, the Central Procurement Board, the Procurement Committee, the Procurement Management Units and Bid Evaluation Committee, probably we do not need the bid evaluation committees, because procurement committees can as well evaluate bids,” argued Katjavivi.

Lawmakers also feel that not enough public consultation took place with stakeholders to enable them to provide their inputs. Swanu president Usutuaije Maamberua said although a few meetings were held during the drafting of the Bill, there is a need for broader consultation. He was also dissatisfied that the Bill aims to provide preferential treatment to bidders from the previously disadvantaged communities only, saying 23 years after independence the nation should move on and look at the burning social question of poverty based on a broader perspective. He said it is a pity that there appears to be class discrimination in Namibia in terms of the manner in which the economy is structured, which also needs to be addressed in the Bill. “What about a poor white person, if they fall under the lower class? I am proposing that we should not only look at the previously disadvantaged communities, but all people in the lower income categories irrespective of colour.”

Maamberua who is the chairperson of the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Public Accounts is also a former permanent secretary in the Ministry of Finance. He questioned why the Bill is silent on the disposal of government assets, which is a function of the Tender Board. “The [proposed] Board (Central Procurement Board) does not have that function, which is a serious omission,” he observed and further pointed out that the Bill appears to be repealing only the current Tender Board Act 16 of 1996, but not other related Acts such as the Regional Councils Act, which also deals with public procurement.”

Presidential Affairs Minister Dr Albert Kawana adjourned the debate to next week Tuesday. Kawana is expected to offer guidance to parliament on the way forward on the contentious Bill. If the National Assembly is still divided, MPs will have to vote on whether to accept the Bill as it is or to reject it and to send it back to the finance ministry for amendment.

New Reports Measuring Gender, Trade, and Public Procurement Policy


AllAfrica.com

25 SEPTEMBER 2013

PRESS RELEASE

The World Bank and Commonwealth Secretariat launched two new publications this week centering on women in business.

‘Women, Business and the Law 2014’ measures how national laws, regulations and institutions differentiate between women and men in ways that may affect women’s capacity to work or set up and run businesses.

The report was launched by the World Bank and International Finance Corporation (IFC) at the Commonwealth Secretariat’s headquarters in London on Tuesday, 24 September.

Dr Augusto Lopez-Claros, Director of Global Indicators and Analysis at the World Bank and IFC said: “In 79 countries the law restricts the types of jobs that women can do. These jobs are often in industries that are higher paying and that creates a pay gap. In the twenty-first century many of these restrictions no longer make sense.”

The Secretariat also presented ‘Gender, Trade and Public Procurement Policy‘, which focuses on how policies for procuring goods and services for government departments can be used effectively to enhance business opportunities for women.

The procurement market often makes up to 10-15% of the GDP of developed countries and can amount for as much as 30-40% of GDP of developing countries. The report looks at how public procurement policies can be used as a tool to open up the market to Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs), including women’s businesses, which are often in the informal sector.

It includes case studies and lessons from four Commonwealth countries: Australia, India, Jamaica and Kenya.

Interim Director in charge of Gender, Health and Education at the Secretariat, Esther Eghobamien said: “The research has demonstrated the impact of public procurement policy as a vehicle for enhancing opportunities for SMEs and women-owned business. Any growth in that sector will translate into real gains for women living below the poverty line.”

Rwanda: 300 Awarded Certificates in Procurement Courses


AllAfrica.com

By Sarah Kwihangana

September 28, 2012

The School of Finance and Banking (SFB) has awarded certificates to over 300 students who have completed training in professional procurement courses.

The 2nd certificate awarding ceremony was held yesterday in Kigali under the theme “Twinning arrangement to develop capacity in procurement for Rwanda.”

The director general, Rwanda Public Procurement Authority (RPPA), Augustus Seminega said that training in professional short courses in procurement is in line with government’s plan to ensure good public procurement practices through skilled manpower.

“Initially, we had no institution offering such courses. I am happy that now our procurement officers can undertake such trainings here in Rwanda and, in turn, our employees acquire more skills,” Seminega said, adding that he was optimistic that the graduands will contribute to good practices to public procurement.

He called on the students to implement what they had learnt and also encourage their colleagues in the same field to pursue such professional courses. He further called for more people to take on these courses since there is still a wide skills gap especially in public institutions.

SFB acting rector Papias Musafiri Malimba underlined the need to create a critical capacity building in the field of procurement as it still lacks skilled professionals.

He appealed to employers to facilitate their employees to acquire such skills and called on the graduates to study all the seven modules of the professional procurement courses.

Jean Pierre Munyabugingo, a procurement consultant and one of the graduates who was also awarded a certificate of trainer, said he had acquired a lot of knowledge in the four courses he had studied under the program.

“I did a course in training of trainers, procurement for good, works and services. These courses are very practical and the knowledge I acquired is going to help me perfect my work. As a trainer I will definitely assist people and organisations where there is a need.”

Peace Asiimwe, an accountant with RPPA, received a certificate in project management and procurement planning. She says it was additional knowledge as an accountant.

“This course has broadened my understanding of procurement practices and processes. I have learnt about the laws and regulations, the process of getting a tender among other things which I intend to put in practice.” Asiimwe said.

Various students received certificates in different fields of; project management and planning, procurement for goods, works, services, audit, and logistics, advanced contract management, and of these seven were awarded certificates for training of trainers.

A law is in the pipeline to put in place an institution in charge of accrediting procurement officers in the country in a bid to enhance professionalism.

Does the procurement profession in Africa have the right profile to capitalise on the region’s economic growth?


SupplyManagement

8 August 2013 | Andrew Allen

Sub-saharan Africa has become one of the world’s great economic success stories. It is the second-fastest growing region in the world after Asia and, according to the International Monetary Fund, it will see growth of more than 5 per cent this year, compared with 3 per cent worldwide.

But is procurement missing the party? Academic Douglas Boateng indicates this may be the case when in a recent presentation he described the function as undervalued and under-rewarded across the region.

Professor Boateng, of UNISA Graduate School of Business Leadership in South Africa and CEO of consultancy PanAvest International, says government and industry increasingly accept the need to bring procurement into the strategic decision-making chamber. But, he adds: “The pontifications have unfortunately not really been matched by real corrective structural adjustments.”

In his view, procurement professionals receive less recognition as well as worse remuneration than counterparts in other business functions. These factors make it hard to attract talent. Lower pay also raises the risk individuals will act unethically.

The solution? Boateng calls on industry leaders and government policy makers to take “decisive steps” to “ensure respectable recognition for the ethically and performance-driven procurement and supply chain management professional”.

The remarks will strike a familiar chord for many procurement professionals in Africa. Chabeli Ramakatane, CEO of Bareki Consulting, South Africa, tells SM: “There is progress, however, it is not at the pace we expect. The highest-paid procurement person here is poorly remunerated compared to the highest-paid finance or marketing person.

“There is definitely a leadership vacuum. Even where you find capable leaders they might not be empowered to do what is necessary.”

At the heart of the problem is organisations’ reluctance to appoint a CPO who reports directly to the CEO and who has a strategic remit. Instead procurement tends to be located further down in the structural hierarchy led by a purchasing manager. “Fewer than 20 per cent of companies or large public sector organisations have CPOs,” says Ramakatane.

Naomi Kinyanjui, civil projects operations manager at Ardan Risk and Support, Kenya, agrees the function has typically been pigeonholed as a back office transactional role. “With regards to it being under-rewarded, that has been true to a large extent,” she says. But she believes that private sector organisations are increasingly beginning to pay their purchasing staff a fair market rate as they realise procurement can add value to their businesses.

Phillip Dahwa, managing partner, The Global Procurement And Supply Chain Management Practice, Zimbabwe, believes that if procurement is undervalued, this is precisely because the function has not yet earned its stripes. “The calibre of most procurement professionals is questionable in most instances,” he says.

While the professionals have technical skills they tend to lack business acumen, softer skills and leadership competencies. This, in turn, has denied them the chance to shine at the highest levels of their organisations, he believes. “The challenge is now for the professionals themselves to prove that they can add value rather than just purporting to be undervalued,” he says.

Skills shortages pose a problem for procurement everywhere, but Tom Woodham, director of Crimson & Co consulting, which works with many multinational clients in Africa, believes the talent pool in Africa is particularly small. Not only are there fewer business graduates in the region but procurement, like most business functions, is lagging behind many other regions in maturity “by about 20 years”. Nevertheless, Woodham does not consider buyers – at least in many of the larger multinationals – to be more poorly paid than colleagues in other business functions. In Africa the lack of prestige attached to procurement rather than lack of pay is the most serious obstacle to attracting the best talent, he believes.

“FMCGs and multinationals really struggle to find people to bring in both in terms of previous experience and of people with an interest in procurement.

“These companies spend an awful lot of money training people and they find they have to start from a lower base than they would in Europe or elsewhere,” he says.

Ulrike Kussing, at PwC in South Africa, believes companies are increasingly seeing the value in supply chain management. “Now there is more of a focus on looking at things end to end. The stance has shifted from the past where it was viewed more as a logistics function,” she says.

Nevertheless Kussing says that while supply chain managers can rely on modern technology and increasingly good infrastructure, problems such as facilitation fees and unreliable delivery times present a major challenge for supply chain professionals.

She is not alone in seeing significant grounds for optimism in the region.

Woodham says: “A lot of multinationals out there are changing their focus. Previously they would have brought in expats to fill vacancies. Now they are training and developing local people.”

For Ramakatane there is one factor that will guarantee procurement’s rise up the corporate ladder in Africa – that organisations will sooner or later come to realise the significant cost savings that can be achieved by implementing a strategic sourcing model.

“We expect organisations in both private and public sector to realise that the only place left to achieve savings or to improve the bottom line is in procurement,” he says.

Does low pay cause corruption?

“Most procurement professionals are not bold enough to stand up against fraud and corruption,” says Phillip Dahwa. “They facilitate corruption in an attempt to win the hearts of their bosses.”

It is a controversial viewpoint but one that African procurement professionals will understand.

Chabeli Ramakatane says the lack of visible punishment for buyers caught accepting bribes is a major incentive for fraudsters. He believes low pay bears some responsibility for the prevalence of bribery, as well as unmanaged conflicts of interest, inadequate screening of suppliers and just plain greed.

Naomi Kinyanjui says it is inevitable that low pay leads to increased temptation to engage in corruption.

However for Ian McNally, vice president of Efficio, it is not always clear where cases of ‘supplier loyalty’ within companies are due to corruption or rather “loyalty to a supply base that has delivered service and where the relationships are strong and long lived”.

“What we have seen is that in most cases, a clear, open, transparent, fact-based approach works with stakeholders in the same way as it works in a European or North American context,” he says.

Ethiopia: Five International Companies Vying to Print Standardised Cheques


AllAfrica.com

By ELLENI ARAYA, 14 JULY 2013

Five companies are in contention to print the National Bank of Ethiopia‘s (NBE) first ever batch of standardised cheques. This was revealed on Tuesday, last week, when the NBE opened bids from cheque printing companies for the supply of 419,261 chequebooks.

In a bid to avoid forgery and expedite cheque clearing and settlement, the NBE, along with the Ethiopian Bankers’ Association (EBA), made a decision to standardise all cheques from banks across the country. This will include the inclusion of security features that are hard to replicate and a technology solution, called Magnetic Ink Character Recognition (MICR).

Following this, the NBE floated a selective tender in May 2013.This procurement tender aimed to select and approve authorised MICR cheque printing companies, which Ethiopian banks could use. In addition, it also targeted selecting a company for the initial standardised printing of cheques to supply Ethiopian banks.

All of the cheques to be printed will have the same features, except for the logos of different banks, which will be printed on them, according to sources within the NBE.

By the extended bid closing date of July 9, 2013, seven companies had participated in the tender. Participants included – Ethiopian Trade-Contract (ET-CON) PLC, Sudan Currency Printing Press (SCCP), Tall printing, Shree Nidhi Secure printing, De La Rue, Madras Secure Printing and Manipal group, according to sources at the NBE.

In the presence of bidders, the procurement team at the National Bank and an advisor from the Commercial Bank ofEthiopia, technical proposals were opened for initial review during bid opening. Two of the companies – the local based, ET-CON, known in the financial sector for providing note and coin counting machines fromSwedenand SCCP – the only MCIR printing company inSudan, were disqualified for not complying with the bidding requirements.

Proposals from the rest of the companies will be evaluated by a bid committee. This includes the property & services management, and clearing and settlement department heads of the NBE, along with advisors from commercial banks, starting this week.

“The Ethiopian Conformity Assessmet Enterprise is also on board to lend its expertise on the quality of cheques to be printed and approve of the committee’s final pick,” an official who works closely on the issue at the NBE told Fortune anonymously

Leadership: a public procurement perspective


News Day

by Nyasha Chizu

May 6th, 2013

Public procurement is generally recognised as reactive, responding or processing purchase requisitions as they are raised, thereby relegating the activity to a clerical level.

This is mainly because the public procurement systems are very complicated and are very difficult to innovate for many reasons.

Some of the reasons could be lack of knowledge and expertise of the leaders, rigidity causing failure of the system to adapt to ever-changing business environment. Despite all these limitations, public procurement needs to be efficient to support public finance management systems. How then do we maximise the efficiencies of government budget execution?

A budget is a plan for a specific period that allocates resources to departments and divisions of the state in order to acquire the required goods and services. It is, therefore, a tool for allocation of funds to accomplish national or organisational objectives. In order to maximise the efficiency of budget execution, public procurement must minimise procurement costs through centralised decision making and decentralised execution.

To show innovation, public procurement must facilitate procurement of commonly used supplies by establishing annual unit price contracts for products in continuous demand.

This inevitably raises efficient budget execution when economies of scale achieve savings at a national level. Institutions such as hospital and local authorities have commonly used supplies that can be procured using this system.

The move, if adopted, will not only save on procurement expenditure itself, but also set a budget saving pattern for all government agencies promoting best practices.

Spooling of commonly used supplies would ensure that the public procurement system puts in place appropriate quality management techniques. Lower priced acquisition or reduced budgets will not compromise quality given the implication of poor quality on a national supplier. The volume of the business becomes attractive that no sane businessman would want to lose the contract due to compromised quality.

While the objective of public procurement is to improve efficiency, the systems need to be transparent and fair. There is generally a conflict of efficiency and transparency in public procurement. Private sector procurement systems are generally regarded efficient because of the elimination of bureaucractic procedures that characterise public procurement.

In the private sector, decisions are made fast and buyers are made accountable for their decisions. It might, therefore, be necessary to train in the public sectors to acquire private sector procurement methods for the efficiency of public procurement systems.

Training alone will not be enough, appropriate systems that promote ethical behaviour are necessary. Public procurement officials need to subscribe to a professional organisation recognised by the government so that moral of buyers is upheld.

This is necessary because public procurement requires that personnel are ethical, as it operates amidst commercial interests of numerous bidding participants. Abiding to a set code of ethic will then be mandatory and appropriate punishment for offenders will be enshrined in the system.

To show innovation, public procurement must facilitate procurement of commonly used supplies by establishing annual unit price contracts for products in continuous demand

Procurement can, therefore, assume a leadership role in the efficient use of budgets through adoption of strategies that minimise costs of inputs in the public sector.

Nyasha Chizu is a Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Purchasing and Supply writing in his personal capacity. Feedback: chizunyasha@yahoo.com

African surveillance market on the rise


Defenceweb

April 18, 2013

The size of the African surveillance market is expected to increase dramatically over the next five years, notably due to unrest affecting the continent.

As unrest and security threats continue to escalate, particularly in Northern Africa, it is reasonable to assume that there will be an increased demand for surveillance technology within the next six months, from various security forces across the region as new opportunities for companies providing surveillance solutions are being created, according to Vislink, a global company specialising in the design and manufacture of secure video communications systems.

Vislink, with offices in South Africa, the UK, USA, UAE, Australia and Singapore, said that the African military and surveillance sectors are still not mature in terms of the technology available to them and so considerable investment in this technology will be required.

“Vislink is ideally situated to capitalise upon this demand, providing the high-quality but affordable equipment necessary to deliver an all-encompassing security effort,” stated Ali Zarkesh, Business Development Director at Vislink.

Globally, the company is doing well in the surveillance and military markets – in 2011, Vislink’s activity in the military field represented 16% of the company’s total revenues and the global market for Vislink’s surveillance products currently sits at around £200 million. Vislink’s activity in the law enforcement sector, which represents 70% of total surveillance revenues, is specifically driven by the growing need for robust video surveillance.

At present, the biggest opportunities in the military and surveillance space are coming from the Middle East, Far East and Latin America, Zarkesh said. Growth in the Middle East is driven by the volatile geopolitical environment and subsequent rising trend in upgrading military communications systems and networks. Vislink is also seeing significant opportunities from coalition forces deployed around the world. These bodies require a reliable means of communication to connect foot patrols, airborne units and command centres.

North African countries, in particular, are currently investing in surveillance solutions in order to help return a level of stability to the region. The political and security situation that has escalated in the past two years has created several opportunities for Vislink in this sector.

“It is also important to consider that several other countries in this part of the world have a heavy military focus. Wide ranging budgets are allocated to the defence sector in order to secure the country’s borders and protect its inhabitants. As a result, Vislink’s main opportunities across developing regions stem from growing covert surveillance demands,” Zarkesh said.

However, the future is not all bright as there are big challenges as well as opportunities in the defence industry. For instance, the UK spends around £34 billion on defence each year, yet the armed forces have recently seen the biggest budget cuts to their sector since 1991. This presents a unique challenge in itself, with military personnel requiring the same high-quality surveillance solutions as before, but now without the premium price tag, Vislink pointed out.

Vislink specialises in the production of satellite, wireless, video and IP solutions and targets government, surveillance, broadcast and news markets. For instance it delivers news gathering tools for the media and surveillance options for the government and military.

The company recently launched its Mantis MSAT, which it claims is the world’s smallest and lightest satellite data terminal, weighing 12.5 kg (27.5 lb). “Following a successful launch, the product has been deployed by several military forces around the world,” Vislink said. The Mantis MSAT can deliver voice, video and data communications, including HD video. Initial military orders have been filled and Vislink’s MSAT terminals are currently undergoing field trials for battlefield, command centre and special operations implementations.

Manhattan Corp awarded R160m Ethiopia EPCM contract


Mining Weekly

By Nathalie Greve

January 14th, 2013

JOHANNESBURG (miningweekly.com) – Local mining services provider Manhattan Corporation would undertake a R160-million contract to build a 25 000 t/m carbon-in-leach (CIL) gold plant, in Mekelle, in Ethiopia, for industrial group Ezana Mining and Development.

The contract would see Manhattan supplying the gold plant on a turnkey basis and included design, engineering, procurement, shipment, construction, installation, implementation, after-sales skills development and support, with an optional offtake contract.

Work on the operation began earlier this month and the plant was expected to be operational by the end of the year.

The company added that the plant process would incorporate crushing, milling, leaching, carbon absorption, washing, stripping, elution, electrowinning and smelting.

“Manhattan is committed to incorporating Ethiopian suppliers, manufacturers and content to maximise job creation and economic development in that country,” Manhattan FD Theo Pouroullis said in a statement.

The plant would incorporate several innovative technologies, including optimised leaching and air-sparging, as well as adaptable feed to the comminution circuit to allow for improved plant availability, up-time and increased final gold production.

The technology provided incorporated CIL and carbon-in-pulp, which consisted of a series of tanks enabling adequate residence time.
The first two tanks would be used for leaching while the remaining six would be used for leaching and absorption.

Manhattan also recently concluded a plant expansion feasibility study for a Glencore subsidiary, in Australia, which involved an assessment of the increase in processing capacity for the operation and a reduction in the overall operating costs.

Additional recent projects included the development of a three-dimensional underground resource development and mine plan for the Manhattan-owned Gravelotte gold mine, in South Africa, which increased the resource from previous inferred resource estimates to a one-million-ounce probable gold reserve.

Edited by: Chanel de Bruyn

Supply Chain Management – turning professional?


The Guardian

The trend for professionalising supply chain management in the private sector is slowly reaching the public sector in Africa but still rarely appears anywhere near the top of development agendas.

The trend for professionalising supply chain management in the private sector is slowly reaching the public sector in Africa but still rarely appears anywhere near the top of development agendas. This despite the fact that, in many developing countries, public procurement accounts for over 50% of GDP, or considerably more where the private sector is small.

Historically, procurement and supply chain management have been undervalued and viewed as a process rather than a professional function. With the realisation that effective supply chain management plays a critical role in ensuring funds are well used, value for money in the delivery of basic services is achieved, and transparency and accountability is assured, the value of professional supply chain management needs to be recognised. How will this happen in countries where procurement is viewed as an “add-on” to other careers?

The wave of legal and institutional reforms to public procurement across Africa over the past few years has certainly focused attention more firmly on the question of capacity building. Many universities are subsequently providing pre-service training in supply chain management which is beginning to instil an early appreciation of the value of the function.

In the health sector, where the issues are more acute, major programmes to combat diseases such as HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis have highlighted the importance of strong procurement and supply chain due to the critical need for regular access to medical supplies. The World Health Organization identifies equitable access to medical products, vaccines and other technologies as one of the six building blocks to a well-functioning health system. The traditional approach to provide expensive in-service supply chain management training to doctors and pharmacists so that they can add this on to their day job is slowly changing but more needs to be done to raise the profile of supply chain management in health institutions.

This trend towards institutional reform in the public procurement sector is not focused solely on health. Procurement training is increasingly available at all levels, from basic introductions to new procurement procedures to academic courses run by universities. Crown Agents has worked with the governments of several African countries to ensure that their procurement capacity building strategies are delivered. Our long expertise in supply chain management and procurement reform and our ability to understand the local environment enable us to work with procurement authorities across Africa. In Ghana for example we helped to develop a whole programme of professional development that covered short, medium and long-term requirements. We partnered with the Institute of Management and Public Administration to implement the short-term plan which was based on training an estimated 25,000 people including procurement staff, tender committees, the private sector and oversight institutions addressing the cross-cutting nature of procurement. We also teamed up with tertiary education institutions to develop the medium and long term training which included a bachelors level degree course in procurement.

Professionalisation is not just about training; it is about transforming the view of the profession itself to ensure a local supply of qualified new recruits in the future. Securing professional accreditation validates and upholds the importance of the supply chain management role. In Botswana for example the Public Procurement and Asset Disposal Board is seeking accreditation of its training materials both nationally and internationally after Crown Agents helped it to develop a series of procurement training modules and completed a training-the-trainers course prior to building capacity in its procuring entities.
Many countries are even establishing their own national professional bodies as membership of international professional institutions such as UK Chartered Institute of Purchasing and Supply and Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport expands significantly in Africa.
In the health sector there are also a number of initiatives that support the strategic role of supply chain managers. Crown Agents has provided technical support and is an active stakeholder in ‘The People That Deliver’ initiative which promotes workforce excellence in supply chain management.
Building supply chain competence and promoting and valuing supply chain management as a professional career can make a positive impact on a country’s economic development and its people’s lives.

Content on this page is produced and controlled by Crown Agents.

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: