Search

Africa's Public Procurement & Entrepreneurship Research Initiative – APPERI

Category

Transportation

‘No illegality’ in procurement of new Kenyan railway


SupplyManagement

26 February 2014 | Will Green

There was no breach of procurement rules in the deal behind a planned new railway connecting Nairobi and the port of Mombasa, the Kenyan parliament has been told.

National Assembly’s (NA) member Maina Kamanda, chairman of the Committee on Transport, Public Works and Housing, which has completed a report on the project, was responding to the question of why the provision of rolling stock had been single sourced.

The Mombasa-Nairobi Single Gauge Railway project, involving a deal between the Kenya Railways Corporation and the China Road and Bridge Corporation, has proved controversial and Transparency International Kenya has written to the transport secretary requesting all information on the contract “for the purpose of forming an independent opinion on the integrity of the procurement process of awarding the contract”.

Kamanda told NA members because the scheme was a “government to government project, which is to be funded by a negotiated loan, it was therefore exempted from the application of the Public Procurement and Disposal Act”.

“The committee found that the procurement entity acted within the law on the single sourcing of the rolling stock and the work of the tender for the China Road and Bridge Corporation,” he said.

Kamanda said the committee found no “illegality or irregularity in the procurement of this project”.

He added: “The government of Kenya should fast-track the signing of the financial agreement between Kenya and the government of the People’s Republic of China to enable the commencement of that project.”

The matter is also the subject of a separate inquiry by the Public Investments Committee.

Supply Chain Management – turning professional?


The Guardian

The trend for professionalising supply chain management in the private sector is slowly reaching the public sector in Africa but still rarely appears anywhere near the top of development agendas.

The trend for professionalising supply chain management in the private sector is slowly reaching the public sector in Africa but still rarely appears anywhere near the top of development agendas. This despite the fact that, in many developing countries, public procurement accounts for over 50% of GDP, or considerably more where the private sector is small.

Historically, procurement and supply chain management have been undervalued and viewed as a process rather than a professional function. With the realisation that effective supply chain management plays a critical role in ensuring funds are well used, value for money in the delivery of basic services is achieved, and transparency and accountability is assured, the value of professional supply chain management needs to be recognised. How will this happen in countries where procurement is viewed as an “add-on” to other careers?

The wave of legal and institutional reforms to public procurement across Africa over the past few years has certainly focused attention more firmly on the question of capacity building. Many universities are subsequently providing pre-service training in supply chain management which is beginning to instil an early appreciation of the value of the function.

In the health sector, where the issues are more acute, major programmes to combat diseases such as HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis have highlighted the importance of strong procurement and supply chain due to the critical need for regular access to medical supplies. The World Health Organization identifies equitable access to medical products, vaccines and other technologies as one of the six building blocks to a well-functioning health system. The traditional approach to provide expensive in-service supply chain management training to doctors and pharmacists so that they can add this on to their day job is slowly changing but more needs to be done to raise the profile of supply chain management in health institutions.

This trend towards institutional reform in the public procurement sector is not focused solely on health. Procurement training is increasingly available at all levels, from basic introductions to new procurement procedures to academic courses run by universities. Crown Agents has worked with the governments of several African countries to ensure that their procurement capacity building strategies are delivered. Our long expertise in supply chain management and procurement reform and our ability to understand the local environment enable us to work with procurement authorities across Africa. In Ghana for example we helped to develop a whole programme of professional development that covered short, medium and long-term requirements. We partnered with the Institute of Management and Public Administration to implement the short-term plan which was based on training an estimated 25,000 people including procurement staff, tender committees, the private sector and oversight institutions addressing the cross-cutting nature of procurement. We also teamed up with tertiary education institutions to develop the medium and long term training which included a bachelors level degree course in procurement.

Professionalisation is not just about training; it is about transforming the view of the profession itself to ensure a local supply of qualified new recruits in the future. Securing professional accreditation validates and upholds the importance of the supply chain management role. In Botswana for example the Public Procurement and Asset Disposal Board is seeking accreditation of its training materials both nationally and internationally after Crown Agents helped it to develop a series of procurement training modules and completed a training-the-trainers course prior to building capacity in its procuring entities.
Many countries are even establishing their own national professional bodies as membership of international professional institutions such as UK Chartered Institute of Purchasing and Supply and Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport expands significantly in Africa.
In the health sector there are also a number of initiatives that support the strategic role of supply chain managers. Crown Agents has provided technical support and is an active stakeholder in ‘The People That Deliver’ initiative which promotes workforce excellence in supply chain management.
Building supply chain competence and promoting and valuing supply chain management as a professional career can make a positive impact on a country’s economic development and its people’s lives.

Content on this page is produced and controlled by Crown Agents.

Transnet signs deal for 96 diesel locomotives


Business Report

October 23, 2013

By Roy Cokayne

TRANSNET was to implement a locomotive fleet procurement “of unprecedented scale in South Africa’s history” worth about R35 billion for 1 064 locomotives in the next quarter, Public Enterprise Minister Malusi Gigaba said yesterday.

This new procurement programme was to meet and maintain the volume targets of Transnet’s market demand strategy in line with its R300bn seven-year investment plan.

It would be made up of 599 new dual-voltage electric locomotives and 465 new diesel locomotives and lay a platform for a seven-year strategic partnership between Transnet and its suppliers in the locomotive cluster, he said.

Gigaba was speaking at the official contract signing ceremony of Chinese manufacturer China South Rail (CSR) Zhuzhou Electric Locomotive as the successful bidder for a contract worth about R2.6bn for 95 electric locomotives for Transnet Freight Rail.

The winning bid was awarded to joint venture company CSR E-loco Supply in which CSR has a 70 percent stake and black economic empowerment (BEE) partner Matsete Basadi holds the remaining 30 percent.

Matsete Basadi comprises Matsete Industrial Services, owned by a group of qualified black professionals, and Matsete Dirang, a wholly-owned woman’s group, which both have a 10 percent shareholding in the joint venture. Five percent each is also held by the Matla Sechaba community trust and an employee scheme that still has to be established.

CSR president Xu Zongxiang said it had been working in the South African market for more than eight years and was familiar with local policies, especially BEE requirements.

Zongxiang said three potential partners had been recommended by its employees in South Africa and it had decided to partner with Matsete Basadi because of the consortium’s specialised commercial and industrial expertise and broad-based background.

Gigaba said the tender was historic because it marked the first time Transnet had procured locomotives to provide capacity for its key rail corridors from a Chinese original equipment manufacturer (OEM).

This reflected South Africa’s commitment to the Brics (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) strategic trade and investment relationships within this emerging economic community, Gigaba said. It also recognised the tremendous progress made in China to build globally competitive capabilities in sectors involving the manufacture of highly sophisticated capital equipment.

The tender awarded to CSR required the suppliers to meet a minimum threshold of 60 percent localisation, but he was unable to quantify how many jobs would be created.

Gigaba said the first 10 locomotives would be assembled in CSR’s factories in China and delivered by December next year, while the remainder would be made in South Africa.

“We believe this will inject massive economic benefits and lead to the development of intermediary sectors who will serve as suppliers because 50 percent of the capital budget will be spent on rail,” he said.

Delivery of the last batch of locomotives is planned for September 2014.

Gigaba said the scale of locomotive fleet procurement was expected to increase in the second phase of procurement in seven years time.

The capital expenditure programme put South Africa on the path of becoming one of a number of manufacturing centres competing on the basis of price and quality, he added.

“We are seeking to partner OEMs not just for the South African market but also for the purpose of exporting to the regional and global market.

“We would like to see our partners make South Africa the design and manufacturing hub for their regional activities, not just in the locomotive supply chain, but in all the spheres in which the OEM is active,” he said.

Mozambique: World Bank admits blame for Beira railway


BY PAUL FAUVET,

July 27th, 2012

Maputo — The World Bank has admitted that it is largely to blame for the failure of the project to rehabilitate the Beira railway system.

The project dates back to 2003, and was intended to completely rehabilitate both the Sena line, running from Beira to the Moatize coal basin in Tete province, and the Machipanda line, from Beira to Zimbabwe.

This involved farming out management of the two lines to the Beira Railroad Company (CCFB), in which 51 per cent of the shares were held by the Indian consortium RICON (Rites and Icon International), and 49 per cent by the Mozambican port and rail company, CFM.

RICON was the dominant partner and was supposed to be in charge of the complete reconstruction of the Sena Line (which had ceased running in 1983, thanks to comprehensive sabotage by the apartheid-back Renamo rebels), and of bringing the Machipanda line up to scratch.

The World Bank was initially enthusiastic about the project, and backed it up with a loan of 104 million US dollars. The tender won by RICON was supervised by the World Bank and the award to RICON was approved by the bank. The concession contract between the government and Ricon/CCFB stated that the entire system should be rehabilitated by January 2009, and that RICON would not only manage CCFB, but would be the main contractor on rebuilding the Sena line and its bridges.

The Mozambican authorities, and CFM, soon began to sound the alarm. Ricon kept missing deadlines, and its work failed to observe technical standards. CFM and the Independent Engineer hired to assess progress both warned about these matters, but the World Bank was conspicuously silent – the Bank’s unit supervising the project took no notice of the warnings.

Ricon argued that it could not meet the January 2009 deadline for completing reconstruction of the Sena line because of the floods in the Zambezi valley in 2007 and 2008. So the government gave Ricon a further six months.

That deadline ran out, and the Sena line was still nowhere near complete. The government tried to switch the management of CCFB to CFM, but RICON used its majority on the CCFB board to block this.

When President Armando Guebuza made a state visit to India in 2010, he discussed the transfer of management power from RICON to CFM. The Indian government agreed, according to Transport Minister Paulo Zucula, but RICON still resisted. Finally, in December 2010 the Mozambican government decided to rescind the contract with RICON.

The World Bank has now issued an Implementation Completion and Results Report (ICR), dated 27 June, which is a damning indictment of the World Bank staff involved in the project. It describes the outcome of the project as “unsatisfactory”, the risk to development outcome as “substantial”, and the bank performance as “unsatisfactory”. The performance of the borrower (the Mozambican government) is described as “moderately unsatisfactory”.

The main project objectives were not remotely achieved. Thus the original goal was to have the Sena line able to carry one million tonnes of cargo a year by the end of 2009. In fact, the line was only opened to coal traffic on 8 August 2011, with freight running at 266,000 tonnes a year – just 27 per cent of the initial target 20 months late.

International traffic on the Machipanda line was supposed to rise from 480,000 tonnes a year in 2004 to 650,000 tonnes in 2009. In fact, if fell, by 2011, to 387,700 tonnes. “The potential for traffic on this line is good (and evidence by the increase in road traffic), but poor infrastructure prevents the railway from getting its share”, commented the ICR report.

All 317 kilometres of the Machipanda line were supposed to be rehabilitated. But in fact not a single kilometre was upgraded. “No rehabilitation and very little (if any) maintenance during the concession period”, remarked the report. “The Machipanda line has deteriorated further and is in fact in worse condition that at the start of the project”.

The overall reliability of the Beira rail system was supposed to improve substantially. The target was that the percentage of track under temporary restrictions should fall from 10 per cent in 2004 to two per cent in 2009. In fact, the figure rose to 16.6 per cent in 2011.

As the conflict between Ricon and the Mozambican authorities deepened, the World Bank’s Project Implementation Unit (PIU) ended up taking Ricon’s side, despite the clear evidence that it was in violation of its contractual obligations. The report admits that “The PIU eventually acted on behalf of the contractor. Despite all the documented delays, the contractor was never penalized”.

That was not the fault of the Mozambicans – the report adds that “all requests by CFM for the PIU to take action against the Contractor for poor execution of the works were ignored”.

One shocking example was that RICON was allowed to relax specifications for ballast to be used on the Sena line despite protests by both CFM and the Independent Engineer.

Furthermore, “the best skilled engineers were prematurely sent back home by the Concessionaire (CCFB), and subsequently replaced by incompetent staff, with the approval of the PIU. Despite repeated objections by the CFM and the Mozambican government, no action was taken to reverse these decisions”.

World Bank staff on the ground just covered up the problems. The report comes close to accusing them of lying to the Bank’s head office. It says “Remarkably, all of the Bank’s supervision reports during the critical stages (2005-2010) gave the project an overall rating of ‘satisfactory’ or ‘moderately satisfactory’. Despite the virulent correspondence between the parties to the contract and the persistent negative reports by the Independent Engineer, the project ratings were never revised and as a result corrective action was never taken”.

The report concludes that the Bank staff had no idea what they were doing – though it puts this in somewhat more diplomatic terms: “The Bank supervision team did not have the requisite engineering skills and competencies to make sense of the implications of the issues raised by the Independent Engineer”.

There were “significant discrepancies” between the Implementation Status Reports produced by the Bank staff and the reports from the Independent Engineer. Thus the Bank staff, in late 2007, were cheerfully forecasting that the Sena line’s first phase would open in early 2008, while at much the same time the Independent Engineer was warning that there was no chance to meet the completion deadlines.

Only when there was a change in the Bank’s supervision and management staff (in 2010) did the World Bank wake up to the seriousness of the situation. It was too late – the loan had already been disbursed.

There had been a chance to change course with the mid-term review in June 2008. By then the project had an alarming cost overrun of 50 million dollars, and construction work was around eight months behind schedule. But the Bank team excused the increase costs as “understandable”.

The ICR report notes “Rather than addressing the incompetence of the Concessionaire as a major bottleneck, the mid-term review pointed to the failure in negotiations over the coal tariff (which was a fairly recent development) and the threat of termination by he government as the main risk to Project progress. This was a missed opportunity to consider Project changes and re-direction”.

The overall message of the report is very clear – after a two year delay and cost overrun of over 50 million dollars, the key goals of the project were not met. The Sena line is not handling the expected level of traffic, and the condition of the Machipanda line is worse than before the project began.

The ICR report expresses a worry that the collapse of the CCFB concession “might trigger a negative perception of public-private partnerships in Mozambique that could reverberate to other sectors or even other countries in the region”.

The Bank is ideologically committed to public-private partnerships – but outsiders might note that the Beira Railway Project is just an extreme example of the recurrent theme in such partnerships that the public sector takes the risk while the private partner walks away with the profit.

Corruption Watch queries R13m tender


www.oil.co.za  Business Report

By SAPA

June 21, 2012

A Corruption Watch probe has found irregularities in a R13 million tender awarded by the department of transport (DOT), the civil society organisation said on Thursday.

The department had awarded a tender to a company which had not fulfilled all the necessary requirements, and overpaid for services by R10 million, it said in a statement.

Global Interface Consultancy won a tender to manage conference and communication services for the department of transport’s international investor conference in June last year.

It had submitted a bid for R13.5 million.

Losing bidder Indigo Design and Event Marketing bid R3.837 million – about one-quarter of the winning bid.

Indigo Design, a BEE-accredited company, lodged complaints with the department, the Public Protector, and Corruption Watch (CW).

“CW’s further investigation into the DOT tender award revealed gross irregularities in the tender process,” Corruption Watch said.

Corruption Watch had handed over its findings, as well as two cases involving irregular public tenders, to the Public Protector for further investigation.

It was in the process of formalising a working relationship with the Protector.

“We will closely monitor the cases that we hand over to the Public Protector and we will assist her office with further evidence and information gathered from the public,” said executive director David Lewis.

“It should be stressed that this case and each of the serious acts of corruption that we are investigating were reported by alert members of the public.”

Comment from the department could not be immediately obtained. – Sapa

Zambia: Witness testifies against Dora


Zambia Daily Mail

By JIMMY CHIBUYE

July 13th, 2012

FORMER minister of Communications Transport Dora Siliya issued instructions to halt the contract for the supply, delivery, installation and commissioning of Zambia air traffic management surveillance radar system awarded to Thales Air Systems of South Africa , a State witness has testified.
Former Zambia Public Procurement Authority (ZPPA) director-general David Kapitolo said Siliya instructed the then permanent secretary Eustern Mambwe to halt the process and retender the duly awarded contract because of alleged corruption. Mr Kapitolo however said the only person who can make variations for the cancellation of the tender awarded by the Central Tender Committee (CTC) is the minister of Finance, who is the chairperson of the CTC and the variations should be done through a statutory instrument.

He was testifying in a case in which Siliya, who is MMD Petauke Central member of Parliament, is charged with two counts of abuse of authority of office, contrary to the Laws of Zambia.The tender for supply, delivery, installation and commissioning of a Zambia Air Traffic Management Surveillance Radar System was for Kenneth Kaunda and Harry Mwaanga Nkumbula International airports.

“I received a letter which was not directed to me but to Ministry of Communications and Transport permanent secretary Eustern Mambwe from the minister asking him [Dr Mambwe] to halt the tender and retender the process because the best evaluated bidder, Thales Air Systems, was not a manufacturer,” he said.

Mr Kapitolo said the procurement process and tender awarded to Thales Air Systems of South Africa was conducted in accordance with the ZPPA rules, up to the selection of the best evaluation bidder and notification but Siliya interjected. He said Selex Systemi Integrati was not among the bidders who submitted their documents for the tender of the radars because their bidding documents were rejected for being delivered late. Mr Kapitolo said he received a letter from Dr Mambwe, seeking the cancellation of the tender awarded by the CTC but he advised that the contract cannot be cancelled by an individual. He said he replied to Dr Mambwe’s letter and advised him that he cannot ask the CTC to cancel the tender because the manufacturer who authorised Thales Air Systems to bid was a reputable institution capable of making the radars.

Mr Kapitolo said unfortunately his letter to Dr Mwambwe was leaked to the media, forcing then President Rupiah Banda to set up a tribunal to investigate the matter. He said after the tribunal’s verdict which cleared Siliya of abusing her office, his contract of employment was terminated.
Mr Kapitolo also said the ZPPA received an anonymous letter alleging that the awarding of a contract to Thales Air Systems was marred by corruption and it should be halted. He said after investigations, it was revealed that the allegations contained in the anonymous letter were a ploy to halt the procurement process so that it could be redone and allow Selex Systemi Integrati to be part of the bidding process.
Mr Kapitolo said the permanent secretary is the purchaser and buyer of any ministry.

It is alleged that Siliya between February 20, 2008 and April 20, 2009 in Lusaka, employed as Minister of Communications and Transport, abused the authority of her office, by directing the cancellation of a duly awarded tender. The tender was for the supply, delivery, installation and commissioning of a radar system to Thales Air Systems South Africa, whose implementation was frustrated. This act was prejudicial to the rights or interests of the Government of the Republic of Zambia. Particulars of the second offence are that during the same period, in breach of laid down procedure, Siliya did accept a purportedly free offer from Selex Systemi Integrati for the repair of a Radar Head at Lusaka International Airport, as a result of which government actually paid K1, 943, 932, 360, an act prejudicial to the rights or interests of the Government of the Republic of Zambia.
The matter will come up today for continued hearing.

New Rea Vaya buses to be SA-made, Joburg council assures


November 4th, 2011

The City of Johannesburg has launched a process to determine the ability of the local automotive sector to build the 134 buses required for Phase 1B of the Rea Vaya bus rapid transit (BRT) locally.

A meeting to provide more information to the industry will be held this month.

Mayoral committee member for transport Rehana Moosajee says the 134 buses – which includes 41 articulated buses – will be operated by a different company from the one managing Phase 1, and will cover a new route through the city, even though it will sport the same branding.

The operating company on the first phase, Pio Trans, includes taxi operators affected by the implementation of the Rea Vaya BRT along the Soweto to Ellis Park route. A crippling bus driver strike has recently halted services on this route for two months.

Phase 1B encompasses the second trunk route of the system, and will run from Noordgezicht to Parktown, and on to the Johannesburg central business district. The 18 km, ten-station project carries an estimated infrastructure cost of R1.2-billion.

The acquisition of buses for Phase 1 of the system was widely criticised as the 143 Scania people movers for this phase were fully imported, even though the company had assembly facilities in South Africa.

Moosajee notes, however, that this was done in order to deal with the “very tight time restrictions” to have the system operational for the FIFA Confederations Cup in June 2009.

“The mayoral committee had then already taken the decision that Phase 1B of Rea Vaya will have to be a catalyst, as far as possible, for local production.”

With Rea Vaya one of many BRT systems being rolled out across the country, national government has taken a particular interest in establishing a viable local bus manufacturing industry in South Africa – one larger than the assembly currently undertaken.

It appears the Department of Trade and Industry will, in December, designate buses for local procurement – meaning it would require government and State agencies to buy locally manufactured buses, as noted by Trade and Industry Minister Rob Davies in a speech at the Johannesburg Motor Show in OctoberRead more.

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: