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Professionalism

Rwanda: Latest – Minecofin PS Appears in Parliament Over Draft Procurement Law


The New Times (Kigali)  via AllAfrica
January 19, 2015

 

Professional procurement officers in the public and private sector will add value to Rwanda’s procurement sector, Kampeta Sayinzoga, the Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Finance, told The New Times.

She was appearing before the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Budget and Patrimony to defend a draft law that seeks to professionalize procurement this morning.

“The added value of this [new] law is that, it actually brings standards and professionalism in the procurement sector for both public and private circles,” said Kampeta.

Once enacted, the law is expected to close the loopholes that have been prevalent in public procurement sector where, according to the Auditor-General, about thirty percent of tenders awarded by public entities do not comply with procurement guidelines.

The new law will strengthen the existing legislative framework that governs public procurement by streamlining all the institutional and legal frameworks governing procurement management.

According to the Auditor General’s report covering the period between August 2012 and June 2013, more than Rwf23 billion was lost in poor contract management procedures, while nine contracts, worth Rwf908 million, were abandoned by contractors.

In a recent interview with The New Times, Augustus Seminega, the Director General of Rwanda Public Procurement Authority, blamed procurement errors on low skill levels, lack of experience and laxity among procurement officers.

Article 2 of the new draft law say that the profession of procurement shall be entrusted with persons who have knowledge, governed by ethical rules and international best practices and those who have chosen to practice it under supervision of a professional body in charge of establishing a code of professional practice.

A call for professionalism in procurement


New Vison

By Francis Emorut        

March 5, 2014

The World Bank has called for professionalism in handling procurement processes in the country in a call made by senior procurement specialist, Howard Centenary.

“It’s a high time we looked at procurement processes beyond compliance but emphasize the need to build professionalism,” he told senior procurement officers, chief administrative officers and heads of departments.

The World Bank specialist argued that experience has shown that 100% compliance has not produced results.

Procurement officers in the country have been castigated for time delays in executing procurement processes and are riddled with corruption.

“Procurement is associated with compliance but I have seen that 100% compliance gets no results,” he argued.

He said there is need to look beyond compliance and focus on the entire procurement process beginning from planning.

“In order to address all the areas we need to build professionalism. Professionals need to exercise discrete judgment when handling procurement processes,” he said.

He made the remarks during the closing of a two-day workshop meant to launch procurement and contract management training manuals programme in Kampala.

The training was conducted by Civil Service College Uganda in conjunction with the ministry of public service and supported by the World Bank.

During the workshop, Centenary talked of early leadership development and underlined that it is the leaders to cause change.

The specialist tasked procurement officers not only to focus on compliance but also bring in innovations which will introduce change in evaluation processes.

The World Bank specialist was backed by the deputy head of civil servants, Hilda Musubira who also advocated for professionalism if service delivery in procurement is to be realized.

“You should make public procurement better by imbibing and demonstrating principles of transparency, accountability, professionalism and impartiality,” said Musubira.

She also appealed to the officers to ensure that they conduct procurement business with outermost efficiency and effectiveness in order to make the public gain confidence in the process.

Aggrey Kibinge, the undersecretary in the Office of the Prime Ministe, raised concern on behalf of trainees that there is need to develop a mechanism of conflict resolution arising out of bidders’ complaints.

The training was based on six modules; emerging trends in public procurement, contracts and contract management, disposal of public assets, evaluation of bids, public procurement and introduction to public procurement and disposal.

Rwanda: 300 Awarded Certificates in Procurement Courses


AllAfrica.com

By Sarah Kwihangana

September 28, 2012

The School of Finance and Banking (SFB) has awarded certificates to over 300 students who have completed training in professional procurement courses.

The 2nd certificate awarding ceremony was held yesterday in Kigali under the theme “Twinning arrangement to develop capacity in procurement for Rwanda.”

The director general, Rwanda Public Procurement Authority (RPPA), Augustus Seminega said that training in professional short courses in procurement is in line with government’s plan to ensure good public procurement practices through skilled manpower.

“Initially, we had no institution offering such courses. I am happy that now our procurement officers can undertake such trainings here in Rwanda and, in turn, our employees acquire more skills,” Seminega said, adding that he was optimistic that the graduands will contribute to good practices to public procurement.

He called on the students to implement what they had learnt and also encourage their colleagues in the same field to pursue such professional courses. He further called for more people to take on these courses since there is still a wide skills gap especially in public institutions.

SFB acting rector Papias Musafiri Malimba underlined the need to create a critical capacity building in the field of procurement as it still lacks skilled professionals.

He appealed to employers to facilitate their employees to acquire such skills and called on the graduates to study all the seven modules of the professional procurement courses.

Jean Pierre Munyabugingo, a procurement consultant and one of the graduates who was also awarded a certificate of trainer, said he had acquired a lot of knowledge in the four courses he had studied under the program.

“I did a course in training of trainers, procurement for good, works and services. These courses are very practical and the knowledge I acquired is going to help me perfect my work. As a trainer I will definitely assist people and organisations where there is a need.”

Peace Asiimwe, an accountant with RPPA, received a certificate in project management and procurement planning. She says it was additional knowledge as an accountant.

“This course has broadened my understanding of procurement practices and processes. I have learnt about the laws and regulations, the process of getting a tender among other things which I intend to put in practice.” Asiimwe said.

Various students received certificates in different fields of; project management and planning, procurement for goods, works, services, audit, and logistics, advanced contract management, and of these seven were awarded certificates for training of trainers.

A law is in the pipeline to put in place an institution in charge of accrediting procurement officers in the country in a bid to enhance professionalism.

Does the procurement profession in Africa have the right profile to capitalise on the region’s economic growth?


SupplyManagement

8 August 2013 | Andrew Allen

Sub-saharan Africa has become one of the world’s great economic success stories. It is the second-fastest growing region in the world after Asia and, according to the International Monetary Fund, it will see growth of more than 5 per cent this year, compared with 3 per cent worldwide.

But is procurement missing the party? Academic Douglas Boateng indicates this may be the case when in a recent presentation he described the function as undervalued and under-rewarded across the region.

Professor Boateng, of UNISA Graduate School of Business Leadership in South Africa and CEO of consultancy PanAvest International, says government and industry increasingly accept the need to bring procurement into the strategic decision-making chamber. But, he adds: “The pontifications have unfortunately not really been matched by real corrective structural adjustments.”

In his view, procurement professionals receive less recognition as well as worse remuneration than counterparts in other business functions. These factors make it hard to attract talent. Lower pay also raises the risk individuals will act unethically.

The solution? Boateng calls on industry leaders and government policy makers to take “decisive steps” to “ensure respectable recognition for the ethically and performance-driven procurement and supply chain management professional”.

The remarks will strike a familiar chord for many procurement professionals in Africa. Chabeli Ramakatane, CEO of Bareki Consulting, South Africa, tells SM: “There is progress, however, it is not at the pace we expect. The highest-paid procurement person here is poorly remunerated compared to the highest-paid finance or marketing person.

“There is definitely a leadership vacuum. Even where you find capable leaders they might not be empowered to do what is necessary.”

At the heart of the problem is organisations’ reluctance to appoint a CPO who reports directly to the CEO and who has a strategic remit. Instead procurement tends to be located further down in the structural hierarchy led by a purchasing manager. “Fewer than 20 per cent of companies or large public sector organisations have CPOs,” says Ramakatane.

Naomi Kinyanjui, civil projects operations manager at Ardan Risk and Support, Kenya, agrees the function has typically been pigeonholed as a back office transactional role. “With regards to it being under-rewarded, that has been true to a large extent,” she says. But she believes that private sector organisations are increasingly beginning to pay their purchasing staff a fair market rate as they realise procurement can add value to their businesses.

Phillip Dahwa, managing partner, The Global Procurement And Supply Chain Management Practice, Zimbabwe, believes that if procurement is undervalued, this is precisely because the function has not yet earned its stripes. “The calibre of most procurement professionals is questionable in most instances,” he says.

While the professionals have technical skills they tend to lack business acumen, softer skills and leadership competencies. This, in turn, has denied them the chance to shine at the highest levels of their organisations, he believes. “The challenge is now for the professionals themselves to prove that they can add value rather than just purporting to be undervalued,” he says.

Skills shortages pose a problem for procurement everywhere, but Tom Woodham, director of Crimson & Co consulting, which works with many multinational clients in Africa, believes the talent pool in Africa is particularly small. Not only are there fewer business graduates in the region but procurement, like most business functions, is lagging behind many other regions in maturity “by about 20 years”. Nevertheless, Woodham does not consider buyers – at least in many of the larger multinationals – to be more poorly paid than colleagues in other business functions. In Africa the lack of prestige attached to procurement rather than lack of pay is the most serious obstacle to attracting the best talent, he believes.

“FMCGs and multinationals really struggle to find people to bring in both in terms of previous experience and of people with an interest in procurement.

“These companies spend an awful lot of money training people and they find they have to start from a lower base than they would in Europe or elsewhere,” he says.

Ulrike Kussing, at PwC in South Africa, believes companies are increasingly seeing the value in supply chain management. “Now there is more of a focus on looking at things end to end. The stance has shifted from the past where it was viewed more as a logistics function,” she says.

Nevertheless Kussing says that while supply chain managers can rely on modern technology and increasingly good infrastructure, problems such as facilitation fees and unreliable delivery times present a major challenge for supply chain professionals.

She is not alone in seeing significant grounds for optimism in the region.

Woodham says: “A lot of multinationals out there are changing their focus. Previously they would have brought in expats to fill vacancies. Now they are training and developing local people.”

For Ramakatane there is one factor that will guarantee procurement’s rise up the corporate ladder in Africa – that organisations will sooner or later come to realise the significant cost savings that can be achieved by implementing a strategic sourcing model.

“We expect organisations in both private and public sector to realise that the only place left to achieve savings or to improve the bottom line is in procurement,” he says.

Does low pay cause corruption?

“Most procurement professionals are not bold enough to stand up against fraud and corruption,” says Phillip Dahwa. “They facilitate corruption in an attempt to win the hearts of their bosses.”

It is a controversial viewpoint but one that African procurement professionals will understand.

Chabeli Ramakatane says the lack of visible punishment for buyers caught accepting bribes is a major incentive for fraudsters. He believes low pay bears some responsibility for the prevalence of bribery, as well as unmanaged conflicts of interest, inadequate screening of suppliers and just plain greed.

Naomi Kinyanjui says it is inevitable that low pay leads to increased temptation to engage in corruption.

However for Ian McNally, vice president of Efficio, it is not always clear where cases of ‘supplier loyalty’ within companies are due to corruption or rather “loyalty to a supply base that has delivered service and where the relationships are strong and long lived”.

“What we have seen is that in most cases, a clear, open, transparent, fact-based approach works with stakeholders in the same way as it works in a European or North American context,” he says.

Africa needs qualified procurement professionals


Ghana Business News

May 23rd, 2013

Mr Samuel Sellas-Mensah, Chief Executive of the Public Procurement Authority (PPA), has said developing countries need well qualified procurement professionals to manage the challenges in the current global economic environment.

He said: “The current global economic environment, which is evident in high levels of unemployment, increased perceptions of corruption, inadequate hard and soft infrastructure and devastating effects of climate change, makes it imperative for the continent to have well qualified procurement professionals”.

Mr Sellas-Mensah said this when he opened a three-day Chartered Institute of Purchasing and Supply (CIPS) Pan-African Conference in Accra on Tuesday.

The event is under the theme: “The Strategic Role of Procurement Professionals in the Development of Africa.”

He said when public procurement was effectively managed by well qualified professionals, there was bound to be rippling effects that could lead to improvement in the economies of developing countries.

Mr Sellas-Mensah said though most factories in Africa might be as productive as those in China and India, the prices of their goods were normally not competitive due to the poor management of their value chains and the lack of requisite infrastructure.

He said there was the need for investment in the training of well qualified procurement professionals who would be able to eliminate all forms of waste and inject efficiency into their sourcing and acquisition process.

Mr Sellas-Mensah said qualified procurement professionals would provide the continent with efficient, professional, accountable and transparent functions, by using their expertise to negotiate and tap into the global supply chain to fit into the principles of procurement.

He said procurement professionals were able to conduct effective ‘supplier and spend’ analysis that would inform managerial decision and align procurement strategies to organizational goals.

Mr Sellas-Mensah said there was a strong correlation between corruption and bad procurement practices and its debilitating effect on African economies, saying countries practicing effective procurement systems were on the path of curbing corruption.

He said investing in the growth and development of procurement professionals on the continent would be a sure way for Africa to realize its dreams and aspirations.

The Chief Executive of the PPA said his outfit had over the years made some achievements due to the development of new procurement monitoring and evaluation tools, publication of manual to operations of public procurement practitioners and training modules of procurement practitioners and the high ratings by the World Bank.

“Our experiences and achievements for almost a decade can attest to the strategic importance of procurement professionals in national development.

“Since public procurement constitutes 20 per cent of GDP of most developing economies and absorbs 50 per cent of their revenue exclusive of government wage bills, it is believed that the procurement function is critical in delivering both functional and horizontal objectives of any development agenda,” he said.

Nigeria: States urged to adopt public procurement system to enhance transparency


Nigerian Tribune

by  Gbolahan SubairAbuja

April 11, 2013

THE Bureau of Public Procurement (BPP) has advised state governors to set up a public procurement system as a way of ensuring further transparency and accountability in government.

Director-General of the BPP, Mr Emeka Ezeh made this call while speaking at a high level interactive session with a delegation of the Lagos State public procurement agency at the state house office in Abuja.

Mr Ezeh praised Lagos State for their procurement reform initiative, adding, however, that the nation would benefit as a whole if more states joined Lagos, even as few other states that have already introduced the reform.

The BPP boss emphasised the fact that there was no alternative to ensuring accountability, transparency and value for money in the public expenditure and contractive process if national development is to be guaranteed.

According to him, due process is the cardinal focus in the implementation of President Goodluck Ebele Jonathan’s Transformation Agenda, and it is also a common mantra in the international economics system and development.

Mr Akin Onimole, the General Manager and CEO of the Lagos State Public Procurement Agency, who led the delegation on the familiarisation visit to the Bureau, emphasised the fact that the Bureau of Public Procurement has set a standard through its public procurement reform that should be emulated in all the states. He stated that the Lagos State Public Procurement Agency has, in the last few years, watched with keen interest the giant strides of the Bureau and as such is most willing to follow in the same path.

Analysis: New law fails to ease oil concerns in Uganda


IRIN NEWS

KAMPALA/NAIROBI, 13 December 2012 (IRIN) – Uganda’s parliament recently passed a law to govern the exploration, development and production of the country’s estimated three billion barrels of oil, a resource whose extraction will directly affect the livelihoods of tens of thousands of people.

While the law streamlines the burgeoning industry, analysts have raised concerns over transparency and over who controls the sector.

“The new law helps set clear guidelines under which the oil sector is to be run and managed, and makes clear who is in charge of what roles,” said Tony Otoa, director of Great Lakes Public Affairs (GLPA), a Uganda-based think tank focusing on oil and governance. “However, there are some concerns about transparency and too much power within the oil industry in the hands of the president.”

The bill was passed on 7 December after weeks of wrangling over its controversial Clause 9, which gives the energy minister wide-ranging powers, including authority over the granting and revoking of oil licenses, negotiating and endorsing petroleum agreements, and promoting and sustaining transparency in the petroleum sector. Many members of parliament (MPs) felt these powers should be held by an independent national oil authority.

“Essentially, the standoff, which has ended, was about the withdrawal of trust from a government that is battered by corruption scandals. Also the way the cabinet operates is that, in the past, the feeling has been that some key ministries, like finance, are effectively run by the presidency after being stuffed by yes-men or -women. The pushback against Clause 9 also comes as the Central Bank opened its vaults to a large withdrawal in 2010 [US$740 million to buy six fighter jets] only for approvals to be sought retrospectively,” said Angelo Izama, a Ugandan journalist and oil sector analyst.

“Loss of trust”

“This loss of trust is behind the resistance to greater control by the executive,” he added. “The executive has not been a bad shepherd of the process so far. Uganda’s negotiating position has been tougher with the oil companies, ironically, without the oversight of parliament. However, public scandals elsewhere have negatively affected the ability of the president to convince lawmakers – especially of his party – that he means well.”

A number of donors – including the UK and Ireland – recently suspended aid to Uganda following allegations of deep-rooted corruption in the Office of the Prime Minister. The prime minister, the former energy minister and the foreign affairs minister were all accused of taking kick-backs from oil companies in 2011, charges that remain unproven but that nevertheless damage the reputation of the government.

“The country lacks trust in the state… Institutions and officials have lost legitimacy, and for such an important bill to vest too much power into a political appointee is a recipe for disaster,” said Stephen Oola, a transitional justice and governance analyst at Uganda’s Makerere University Refugee Law Project.

“Granting and revoking licenses and negotiations are technical in nature. We need an independent commission or authority made up of people of good competence, technical ability and experience, and good morals to guard our oil,” said Frank Gashumba, a local businessman and social activist.

Proponents of Clause 9 say licensing powers are safer in the hands of the cabinet than under an oil authority. “The authority is open, easy to bribe and manipulate. Cabinet is bigger than the authority – members of the executive are answerable to Ugandans because they are elected leaders,” said Kenneth Omona, a ruling party MP.

Those opposed to it say they will challenge the law, which was passed with 149 votes in favour and 39 against; some 198 MPs did not turn up to vote.

“The fight is not complete; the passing of the bill is liable to be challenged in courts of law,” said Theodore Ssekikubo, ruling party MP and chair of the parliamentary forum on oil and gas. “If we fail to go to court, we shall subject the matter to a referendum for all Ugandans to pronounce themselves on this strategic resource. We want to ensure transparency and accountability in the oil sector.”

Transparency

There are also concerns about the law’s confidentiality clause, which limits the amount of information accessible by the public.

“The law is lacking transparency – it imposes confidentiality on officials working within the sector, even after they leave office, so there is no opportunity for whistle-blowing or for the public to have access to information on, say, production-sharing agreements,” GLPA’s Otoa said.

He noted that Uganda still hasn’t joined the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI), an international scheme that attempts to set a global standard for transparency in oil, gas and mining, further compounding the sector’s lack of transparency. As a member of the EITI, Uganda and oil companies involved in the country would be required to publish all payments and revenues from the industry.

While Total and the China National Offshore Oil Corporation (CNOOC), two of Uganda’s major oil partners, are listed on Wall Street and are therefore subject to the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act – which requires disclosure of payments relating to the acquisition of licenses for exploration and production of oil, gas and minerals – the Irish firm Tullow Oil, another of Uganda’s main oil partners, is not under any similar obligations.

“I am worried we [legislators] and the public can’t access and scrutinize these agreements. You can imagine the recently negotiated and signed oil agreements have not been accessed by the public, not even by members of parliament,” Beatrice Anywar, former shadow energy minister, told IRIN.

The impact of the oil sector has so far been most acutely felt by communities around Lake Albert, thousands of whom have had to move – some willingly and some forcefully – to make room for an oil refinery, which is expected to take up 29sqkm and displace some 8,000 people.

Land issues

“The government is prosecuting the refinery resettlement by the book. However, managing public expectations and the process of multiple decision makers in Uganda’s complex land legal system [Uganda has multiple land systems, including customary, leasehold and freehold] has contributed some volatility to the process… What is adequate compensation? And who determines that? Is it the market or should this be done by the government?” said journalist Izama.

“As a partner to the oil companies, it’s questionable too if the government can make the best decisions for the affected people as it would look to keep project costs fairly low,” he continued. “It is still a dilemma which is jurisprudential as well as political.”

He noted that much of the oil is in game reserves and a sensitive basin with lakes, rivers and a rare biodiversity, and borders the Democratic Republic of Congo, which could also pose challenges for peaceful production; there has already been some tension between the two countries over their boundaries within Lake Albert.

“The process of consensus-building is still weak, and regardless of how it’s arrived at, displacements will create uncomfortable realities, including land and job pressure.”

According to Otoa, Uganda’s lack of a comprehensive land policy makes compensation issues more complex. “We need clear land policies to ensure people are properly compensated – there is a Resettlement Action Plan in place, but it has not been implemented, and a draft land policy has not been actualized, leaving these communities vulnerable,” he said.

He noted that the lack of education among the local population, both in the oil-rich areas and the rest of the country, had contributed to the continued problems in the sector.

“We have focused too much on educating MPs on the implications and importance of good oil governance. We need to move to people-centred approaches and encourage dialogue in the public sphere, which will lead to people demanding accountability from their MPs and the government,” he added.

Ultimately, Izama said, responsible actions by the government will be the difference between Uganda’s oil making a significant impact on the country’s economy or causing conflict and greater poverty.

“Pressure on public institutions prior to commercial oil production is an effective way of counteracting the resource curse. If this public engagement falters, if the transition [from President Museveni to his successor] is volatile, some of the scenarios of the so-called oil curse are possible,” he said. “Overall the tensions are high, but responsible actions by public and political institutions like the past debate show progress is possible.”

Uganda participates in East African procurement forum


The Independent

By Julius Businge

December 5, 2012

The Public Procurement and Disposal of Public Assets (PPDA) Executive Director, Cornelia Sabiiti is leading a team of 19 professionals to a regional procurement forum in Bujumbura, Burundi that runs from Dec. 5 to 7, the procurement body said in a press statement released on Dec. 5.

Over 200 delegates from public, private and civil organisations in the region are attending the 5th East African Procurement Forum being held in Bujumbura.

During the three day conference delegates from Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda and South Sudan will deliberate on issues affecting public procurement in the region. The objective of the forum is to serve as a framework that helps participants learn and benchmark with each other on their respective public procurement systems including policies and enforcement measures.

The Ugandan team includes delegates from Civil Aviation Authority (CAA), Uganda Revenue Authority (URA), Uganda National Roads Authority (UNRA), Ministry of Education & Sports, Uganda Management Institute (UMI), Ministry of Health, Kampala Capital City Authority (KCCA), Ministry of Local Government, National Environment Management Authority (NEMA), Uganda Coffee Development Authority (UCDA), Institute of Procurement Professionals of Uganda (IPPU), AH Consulting and the Ministry of Defense.

Uganda will be presenting six papers including a paper on ethics and transparency in the management of public procurement; the contribution of civil society and the public sectors on ethics and transparency in public procurement. Another paper will look at the challenges of an independent regulatory authority.

The Burundi forum comes on the heels of the successful public procurement symposium PPDA held in September 2012 bringing together public and private sector professionals in Uganda.

Supply Chain Management – turning professional?


The Guardian

The trend for professionalising supply chain management in the private sector is slowly reaching the public sector in Africa but still rarely appears anywhere near the top of development agendas.

The trend for professionalising supply chain management in the private sector is slowly reaching the public sector in Africa but still rarely appears anywhere near the top of development agendas. This despite the fact that, in many developing countries, public procurement accounts for over 50% of GDP, or considerably more where the private sector is small.

Historically, procurement and supply chain management have been undervalued and viewed as a process rather than a professional function. With the realisation that effective supply chain management plays a critical role in ensuring funds are well used, value for money in the delivery of basic services is achieved, and transparency and accountability is assured, the value of professional supply chain management needs to be recognised. How will this happen in countries where procurement is viewed as an “add-on” to other careers?

The wave of legal and institutional reforms to public procurement across Africa over the past few years has certainly focused attention more firmly on the question of capacity building. Many universities are subsequently providing pre-service training in supply chain management which is beginning to instil an early appreciation of the value of the function.

In the health sector, where the issues are more acute, major programmes to combat diseases such as HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis have highlighted the importance of strong procurement and supply chain due to the critical need for regular access to medical supplies. The World Health Organization identifies equitable access to medical products, vaccines and other technologies as one of the six building blocks to a well-functioning health system. The traditional approach to provide expensive in-service supply chain management training to doctors and pharmacists so that they can add this on to their day job is slowly changing but more needs to be done to raise the profile of supply chain management in health institutions.

This trend towards institutional reform in the public procurement sector is not focused solely on health. Procurement training is increasingly available at all levels, from basic introductions to new procurement procedures to academic courses run by universities. Crown Agents has worked with the governments of several African countries to ensure that their procurement capacity building strategies are delivered. Our long expertise in supply chain management and procurement reform and our ability to understand the local environment enable us to work with procurement authorities across Africa. In Ghana for example we helped to develop a whole programme of professional development that covered short, medium and long-term requirements. We partnered with the Institute of Management and Public Administration to implement the short-term plan which was based on training an estimated 25,000 people including procurement staff, tender committees, the private sector and oversight institutions addressing the cross-cutting nature of procurement. We also teamed up with tertiary education institutions to develop the medium and long term training which included a bachelors level degree course in procurement.

Professionalisation is not just about training; it is about transforming the view of the profession itself to ensure a local supply of qualified new recruits in the future. Securing professional accreditation validates and upholds the importance of the supply chain management role. In Botswana for example the Public Procurement and Asset Disposal Board is seeking accreditation of its training materials both nationally and internationally after Crown Agents helped it to develop a series of procurement training modules and completed a training-the-trainers course prior to building capacity in its procuring entities.
Many countries are even establishing their own national professional bodies as membership of international professional institutions such as UK Chartered Institute of Purchasing and Supply and Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport expands significantly in Africa.
In the health sector there are also a number of initiatives that support the strategic role of supply chain managers. Crown Agents has provided technical support and is an active stakeholder in ‘The People That Deliver’ initiative which promotes workforce excellence in supply chain management.
Building supply chain competence and promoting and valuing supply chain management as a professional career can make a positive impact on a country’s economic development and its people’s lives.

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